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data reporting

Picture of Michael Millenson

Journalists can and should hold local hospitals accountable for matching a stated commitment to transparency with concrete actions. It's a difficult job, but here are some ways reporters can get started.

Picture of William Heisel

When you can't find the data you need and you end up building your own reporting database, you very likely will be criticized. Here's how to prepare for a few of the most common criticisms.

Picture of William Heisel

If you have a story that needs to be told, don't wait for a huge attachment to show up in your inbox. Hunt for the data that will help you tell your story. And keep in mind that a data expert can be an invaluable guide along the way.

Picture of Jenna Flannigan

A deep dive into the data on federal pay-for-performance programs for hospitals turned up a few key lessons along the way for Healthline's Jenna Flannigan, including the importance of understanding what health metrics are actually measuring.

Picture of William Heisel

Earlier in my career, I thought I needed “big data” to take my reporting to the next level. But I didn't understand at the time that truly big data was beyond my grasp. Most reporters don't need to manipulate such huge datasets to carry out smart, data-driven journalism.

Picture of Ryan White

Cohen recently gave California fellows a master class in how to approach public records. In her talk, Cohen stressed the level of pre-reporting that needs to be done before filing a request. Here are a few key takeaways.

Picture of Sean Hamill

Nearly 60 hospitals have closed in the U.S. since 2010. In reporting on how hospital closures affect poor patients in Rust Belt towns, reporter Sean Hamill found first-person accounts to be crucial. But backing up those stories with data and geographical comparisons also provided essential context.

Picture of Thomas Corwin

Reporter Tom Corwin of The Augusta Chronicle was shocked to learn of 82 unexpected deaths in 2013 among disabled patients receiving care in community placements in Georgia. The discovery launched him on an extended data-driven investigation. Here he shares lessons from the series.

Picture of Frank Gluck

Reporter Frank Gluck recently spent five months reporting on how Alzheimer’s disease has affected Southwest Florida, where the population of seniors is twice the national average. Here he shares some essential reporting lessons and tips for others tackling the topic in their region.

Picture of Kristen Schorsch

We've all heard the stories of hospital closures, but what about when hospital beds go unfilled? Kristen Schorsch of Crain's Chicago Business examined the trend of "overbedded" hospitals in Illinois and shares tips and resources on how to report similar stories in your region.

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Announcements

Got a great idea for a reporting project on the health of underserved communities in California or on the performance of the state's health and social safety nets?  We're offering reporting grants of $2,000 to $10,000, plus six months of mentoring, to up to eight individual journalists, newsrooms or cross-newsroom collaboratives.  Deadline to apply:  September 20.

Interested in honing your data analysis and visualization skills and taking home a reporting grant of $2,000-$3,500? Dates: October 23-26. Deadline to apply: August 26. Click on the headline to learn more.

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