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Picture of Cary Aspinwall
We're asking distinguished reporters to highlight an issue or story that is either being missed entirely or underreported by the media.
Picture of Jill Replogle
It was a vexing data riddle: Were opioids leading seniors to commit suicide? Or did they have major health problems that led them to take their lives?
Picture of Bethany Barnes
"If newsrooms want coverage to be diverse, newsrooms must back up that aim with an investment of time," writes The Oregonian's Bethany Barnes. Here's how she invested her reporting time.
Picture of Tracie Potts
"Data is the backbone of good reporting, but people make the audience care," writes broadcast reporter Tracie Potts. Here's how she finds the people that make the story.
Picture of Molly  Peterson
Climate change is making the problem of urban heat a growing health risk. But reporting on the scope of the problem is full of challenges, as Molly Peterson explains.
Picture of Andy Krackov
From my vantage point as a former journalist who much admires what reporters can contribute, journalists can play a more activist role and in so doing help improve the health of the communities in which they live and work.
Picture of Leonardo Castaneda
Data journalist Leonardo Castaneda offers reporters a detailed tutorial on how to analyze — and then map — data from any county's medical examiner's office on opioid-related deaths.
Picture of William Heisel
Journalists have heard it a million times: use multiple sources. But as William Heisel explains, that means more than conducting a bunch of interviews and filling up notebooks.
Picture of Darryl Holliday
For an ambitious project on lead in Chicago, City Bureau started with the question: "How do we as journalists meet people where they are?" The answer included a text-message service that responds with lead test data for the user's community.
Picture of Rusha Modi
There is a bizarre paradox in the culture of medicine: The system generates more data than ever, but questionable priorities are limiting our ability to effectively use it.

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The Center for Health Journalism is dedicated to supporting journalists covering two of the biggest stories of our time — the twin pandemics of COVID-19 and systemic racism and inequities in America. We provide reporters with intensive training instituteswebinars and tips about craft and content and are providing deep and sustained support for reporters and their newsrooms in this historic and difficult moment. You can donate through the USC web portal at this link. Pressed for time? You can also text to donate! No amount is too small; just send a text to 41-444 and type the message CHJ for further instructions.

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