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Department of Health and Human Services

Picture of Jenna Chandler

During several inspections over the past five years, federal regulators cited the five local hospitals tracked by the Orange County Register nearly 100 times for infection control violations. The most common problems were incorrectly sterilized surgical tools and dirty operating rooms and equipment.

Picture of Kellie  Schmitt

Leading journalists and a former Obamacare official offered predictions, discussed possible outcomes and shared story ideas for the much-anticipated Supreme Court decision on King v. Burwell at a Reporting on Health webinar this week.

Picture of Kellie  Schmitt

The ACA expanded insurance coverage, but many children throughout the country are still not receiving important health care benefits. The extent of the coverage exclusions varies widely depending upon which state a child calls home.

Picture of Jennifer Haberkorn

The Affordable Care Act was crafted with an ambitious goal of expanding health care coverage to millions of uninsured Americans. But they won’t enroll if they don’t know about available policies or if it’s too cumbersome or confusing to sign up for coverage.

Picture of Erin Marcus

Florida's controversial Medicaid privatization program has made the system more difficult to navigate over the past decade, according to some patients and health advocates. Has the U.S. Supreme Court's ACA ruling given the state an opening to expand privatization further?

Picture of Gergana Koleva

Hospitals across the country are using near-total discretion in the way they disclose infections that occur as a result of surgeries, cause over 8,000 deaths annually in the U.S., and cost an additional $10 billion per year to the healthcare system, a new study underscoring the need for public reporting standards has found.

Picture of Betsy  Cliff

Each year thousands of patients are harmed by medical care in Oregon. A Bend woman, Mary Parker, was one.

Picture of William Heisel

The new report about the criminal histories of nursing home workers from the Office of Inspector General for Department of Health and Human Services has prompted many bold statements. What has been missing from all the alarmist analyses of this report are a few key facts and a sense of perspective.

 

Picture of William Heisel

Are nursing home workers with criminal records really endangering residents? It's hard to tell from a new inspector general's report.

Picture of William Heisel

The Wall Street Journal’s Mark Schoofs and Maurice Tamman have been dismantling Medicare’s claims database piece by piece for months in a series of blockbuster stories under the umbrella “Secrets of the System.”

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The COVID-19 pandemic has ushered in soaring levels of child hunger and food insecurity in families across the nation. In our next webinar, we’ll explore fresh angles for deeper reporting on hunger, food insecurity and other unmet needs in your community. Sign-up here!

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