Skip to main content.

diabetes

Picture of Antonia Gonzales
Antonia Gonzales and Sarah Gustavus traveled to the Navajo Nation recently to examine how a lack of access to water in many homes influences beverage choices and what might be done to increase water consumption among young people.
Picture of Sarah Gustavus
Chronic illnesses, particularly diabetes, are a longstanding public health concern in many tribal communities in the Southwest. Sarah Gustavus and Antonia Gonzales examine how some individuals have overcome those challenges and are now sharing information and resources.
Picture of Antonia Gonzales
Navajo comedian, motivational speaker and advocate Pax Harvey is among advocates addressing health and wellness in tribal communities at a grassroots level.
Picture of Antonia Gonzales
Program participants at a drum and dance class speak about what wellness means to them and how culture is part of their efforts to decrease stress, engage in their community and maintain sobriety.
Picture of Kellie  Schmitt
The effort to limit children's daily sugar intake is gaining traction, fueled by emerging science, new beverage taxes, and new pediatric recommendations.
Picture of Merdies Hayes
The African American community has been witness to some of the worst health outcomes of any population. Officials at Martin Luther King Jr. Community Hospital in Watts are trying to remedy that situation by focusing on preventative health.
Picture of Merdies Hayes
This article was produced as a project for the USC Center for Health Journalism’s California Fellowship.
Picture of Merdies Hayes
Can a revamped community hospital overcome a history of dysfunction and place residents of South Los Angeles on a path to better health and lower rates of chronic disease?
Picture of Monya De
Whether it's Taco Bell’s Naked Chicken Chalupa or the Flamin' Hot Cheeto Bagel, media coverage of stunt foods “only normalizes extreme levels of salt and sugar in food and alters our taste buds to promote addiction,” argues Dr. Monya De.
Picture of Elizabeth Aguilera
It can be hard to find new, compelling ways of telling stories about well-known health issues. But as reporter Elizabeth Aguilera discovered in her series on type 2 diabetes, that shouldn’t stop you.

Pages

Announcements

A global pandemic, a national reckoning with racism, botched school reopenings and leadership vacuums — it's not an easy moment to be starting out as a journalist. Join us as we hear from three youth journalists from around the country as they discuss the massive challenges confronting their generation. Sign-up here

Ready to take your journalism to a new level by honing your data analysis and visualization skills?  We're offering our highly acclaimed annual Data Fellowship through Zoom from Nov. 30-Dec. 4.

Do you have a great idea for a potentially impactful reporting project on a health challenge in California?  Our 2020 Impact Fund can provide financial support and six months of mentoring.

CONNECT WITH THE COMMUNITY

Follow Us

Facebook


Twitter

CHJ Icon
ReportingHealth