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diabetes

Picture of Samuel White Swan-Perkins
This article was produced as a project for the USC Center for Health Journalism’s California Fellowship.
Picture of Samuel White Swan-Perkins
This article was produced as a project for the USC Center for Health Journalism’s California Fellowship.
Picture of Michael  Hochman
Will a diagnosis of “prediabetes” motivate meaningful lifestyle changes among patients, or simply lead patients and providers to use medications rather than refocus on aggressive lifestyle changes?
Picture of Elizabeth Aguilera
Experts believe they won't get the upper hand on the disease until they persuade enough people that a healthy diet and regular exercise can prevent it or minimize its damage if it has already struck.
Picture of Elizabeth Aguilera
Diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes when she was 11 years-old, Carolina takes three types of insulin and four other medications every day. Diabetes experts say the family's situation is fairly common.
Picture of Kristin Gourlay

Diabetes rates are soaring across the nation. But in Rhode Island, the Hispanic population has seen the most dramatic increase of any other group over the past few years.

Picture of Samuel White Swan-Perkins

A reporter sets out to investigate the impact of the federally funded program for Women, Infants, and Children on Native families. Is the diet made possible by the program doing more harm than good in California's Native American communities?

Picture of Lenzy Krehbiel-Burton

Nationwide, one in seven families experience food insecurity at any given point in a year. The rates are higher in Indian Country, increasing the risks for the physical effects that come with poor nutrition.

Picture of Elizabeth Aguilera

Diabetes impacts nearly 10 percent of Americans and people of color are twice as likely to be diagnosed. Another 8 million have not been diagnosed and millions more are considered pre-diabetic. Why have diagnoses increased so quickly? And what might offer promise in slowing its spread?

Picture of Patricia Wight

According to the Maine Children’s Alliance, 30 percent of Maine kids ages 10-17 are overweight. That’s more than 36,000 kids, and nearly half of those are considered obese. And children from low-income families are especially vulnerable.

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