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This story is Part 14 of a 15-part series that examines health care needs in Gary, Ind.

When Shantray Hooks, of Gary, lost her job as a restaurant cook in August, she didn’t know how she would pay for doctor visits.

“I had no health insurance and I couldn’t afford to pay a doctor,” said Hooks, 29, who was diagnosed with diabetes several years ago.

A doctor referred her to the Community Health Net of Gary, a federally qualified community health center that provides comprehensive primary care health services and charges on a sliding fee scale for services.

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Disease, disaster and video games are highlighted in today's Daily Briefing.

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As you may have learned about through DiabetesMine today, the Diabetes Hands Foundation (the nonprofit responsible for TuDiabetes, EsTuDiabetes and diabetes awareness programs such as Big Blue Test, No-Sugar Added Poetry and Word In Your Hand) has received a capacity building grant from The Leona M. and Harry B. Helmsley Charitable Trust. We wanted to share this great news with the RoH community!

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This story is Part 9 of a 15-part series that examines health care needs in Gary, Ind.

Dorothy Manley knew something was wrong nine years ago because whenever she ate sweets, she grew sleepy.

Manley, 77, of Gary, visited a local health fair and was advised to see her doctor.

“That’s when I found out I had diabetes,” said Manley, a former U.S. Postal Service supervisor who retired with 30 years of service in Chicago. The news frightened her because a former neighbor with uncontrollable diabetes lost an arm and both legs to amputation.

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This story explores how a Utah hospital attempts to slow the revolving door of asthma hospitalizations. It is a sidebar to the third part of May's series on health disparities in Salt Lake City.

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A new study finds that stress doesn't have much effect on fertility treatment, plus more from our Daily Briefing.

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People living with diabetes in San Joaquin County may have cause for concern: The county ranks worst in the state for deaths caused by diabetes. Medical officials say the lack of education and resources are to blame.

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While speaking at the National Institutes of Health on Tuesday, USAID Administrator Rajiv Shah (left, photo source USAID) told the audience of scientists how the development agency would support the creation of new innovations and their delivery to improve the health of the world’s neediest popul

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This story is Part 8 of a 15-part series that examines health care needs in Gary, Ind.

Gary resident Teresa Johnson said she recognizes the woman in the “before” pictures and remembers her pain.

Johnson, 50, who worked with developmentally disabled adults in Lake and Porter counties before becoming disabled, said she has been overweight all her life.

“I had very little success losing weight on my own,” she said. “I’d lose weight and then gain it right back. But last year I needed a knee replacement surgery and didn’t want to have it while I was still morbidly obese.”

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For many Mexican immigrants living in New York, working multiple jobs leaves little time for regular exercise. In addition, a heavy reliance on public transportation and a lack of rural areas means that physical activity is virtually nonexistent. Health experts cite this sedentary lifestyle as an emerging gateway to diabetes, especially among immigrants.

This story was originally published in Spanish. Below is the English translation.

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