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disease

Picture of Nalea J. Ko

The Asian Pacific American community includes more than 100 languages/dialects and some 45 different ethnic subgroups, complicating the prevention and treatment of HIV/AIDS.

Picture of Nathanael Johnson

Counterfeit pills, direct primary care, bogus health food claims, drug-industry science and more from our Daily Briefing.

Picture of Kate  Benson

At this month's AHCJ convention, blogger Sonya Collins tells us "speaker after speaker reminded us that we medical journalists shouldn’t lead with the numbers that quantify the reach of a disease or its cost to taxpayers.  We should lead with the face of someone who lives with that condition. Show our readers that she’s just like them."

She goes on to give a wonderful example of how stigma can be reduced through good storytelling.

But what if the stigma begins in part with journalists?

Picture of Katherine  Leon

How can journalists work better with patients to tell their stories? Here's advice from one experienced patient.

Picture of Leiloni  De Gruy

For people living with HIV or AIDS, nutrition is a key component of any treatment plan. But living in neighborhoods where healthy food options are few and far between can make it difficult to eat healthy.

Picture of Barbara Feder Ostrov

How do you sort through the cacophony of health conversations taking place on Twitter? Healthcare hashtags can help.

Picture of Nathanael Johnson

Drug abuse, genetic disease clusters, mammography, comparison hospital shopping and more from our Daily Briefing.

Picture of Kate Long

One in six of Logan County's 36,700 residents is a diabetic, according to the Centers for Disease Control, and there are many more who don't know they have it.

Picture of Kate Long

For four hours, Bill Hall used to lie on a padded vinyl recliner, one arm stretched out, two thick needles sticking out of it. One needle drained the blood from his body. The other put it back.

Picture of Kate Long

Think about this: More than 200,000 West Virginians have contracted a disease that kills people. About 69,000 of them don't know they have it.

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The Center for Health Journalism is dedicated to supporting journalists covering two of the biggest stories of our time -- the twin pandemics of COVID-19 and systemic racism and inequities in America. We provide reporters with intensive training instituteswebinars and tips about craft and content and are providing deep and sustained support for reporters and their newsrooms in this historic and difficult moment. You can donate through the USC web portal at this link: https://bit.ly/3c8d4xs  Pressed for time? You can also text to donate! No amount is too small; just send a text to 41-444 and type the message CHJ for further instructions.

 

In this webinar, we'll look at how journalists can tell urgent stories as states reopen and workers are potentially forced to choose between their health and their economic survival. Sign-up here!

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