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Picture of Angilee Shah

Global health and international development blogger Alanna Shaikh gives tips for translating and working with translators to talk about health more clearly.

Picture of Elizabeth Varin

Theoretically, Imperial Valley should be one of the healthiest areas of the nation if you look at food production. With a more than $1 billion agriculture industry growing almost anything under the sun, including artichokes, bamboo shoots, citrus, hay, leafy greens, broccoli, cauliflower, and more than 100 other types of crops, residents should have a nearly unlimited supply of fresh fruit, vegetables and meat, leading to a health community.

Picture of Caitlin Buysse (Kandil)

Healthy food is in short supply in communities of color

Picture of Ricki Lewis

Correcting a genetic defect before birth sounds like a great idea, but I'm uncomfortable with how we get there.

Picture of Kate  Benson

Cutting edge technology may be the game changer in controversial disease.

Picture of Sandy Kleffman

Some non-profit hospitals in the San Francisco Bay Area receive millions of dollars in tax breaks each year to care for the poor and uninsured, yet they provide only a fraction of local charity care. Sandy Kleffman reports.

Picture of Laura Newman

If Americans could vote with their feet, I think too that they would want urologists to treat the truly important areas in urology, rather than a disease that the odds are will not cause trouble for most men.

Picture of Rochelle Sharpe

An iWatch News investigation documents $1.9 billion in wasted federal health care expenditures.

Picture of Kate  Benson

The association of a murine retrovirus with ME/CFS appears to be no longer viable, but many of the researchers who can't find XMRV in patients still believe that other viruses are at play.

Picture of Barbara Feder Ostrov

Preschoolers' lunches and food safety, a slowdown in hospital building, men get breast cancer too, and more in our Daily Briefing.

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