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disease

Picture of Kate  Benson

Do death threats to an isolated few make for good journalism or just sensationalism? And in pursuing the unusual do journalists run the risk of skewing the overall situation? Does having one source on each side of the issue really provide accurate balance and meaningful context? Questions are easy, answers are harder.

Picture of Kate Long

Journalist Kate Long's home state faces staggering health problems, prompting her project to explore West Virginia’s rising tide of chronic disease and obesity and the considerable efforts by its residents to reverse it.

Picture of Ricki Lewis

"Dignity therapy" is a "novel psychotherapeutic approach" that gives patients with a 6-month life expectancy "an opportunity to reflect on things that matter most to them or that they would most want remembered." In fact, hospice volunteers have been providing dignity therapy for decades.

Picture of Rishi Manchanda

On the front lines of caring for the poor, one doctor examines how proposed deep cuts to Medicaid could hurt his patients.

Picture of Ricki Lewis

How far are we from personal genome scans that yield long lists of risks, some meaningful, some not? Who will develop the criteria for what is meaningful, for what a patient should know?

Picture of Maureen OHagan

For a decade, Washington has been fighting for your life. Yet you might not even know this because it's been a quiet battle, a fight designed to work its way into the fabric of your life. It's about your weight — or, more important, the weight of your children.

Picture of Barbara Feder Ostrov

Connecting cell phones to cancer, HIV/AIDS at 30, hospital drug shortages and more in today's Daily Briefing.

Picture of Sunita Sohrabji

The increase in HIV infections has risen alarmingly among Asian American women, and will soon surpass the rate of infections in high-risk populations unless intervening measures are taken, noted a panel of experts in San Francisco on May 17.

Picture of Laura Newman

After three days of listening to expert neurologists, demographers, caregivers, and policy people on Alzheimer's disease, journalist Laura Newman raises tough questions for journalists to consider to avoid oversimplifying this complicated topic.

Picture of Mary Pember

The National Library of Medicine plans an exhibit of Native American healing practices this fall. In preparation, its physician-director met and questioned nine renowned Indian medicine men in Bismark, ND, a rare encounter.

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The Center for Health Journalism is dedicated to supporting journalists covering two of the biggest stories of our time -- the twin pandemics of COVID-19 and systemic racism and inequities in America. We provide reporters with intensive training instituteswebinars and tips about craft and content and are providing deep and sustained support for reporters and their newsrooms in this historic and difficult moment. You can donate through the USC web portal at this link: https://bit.ly/3c8d4xs  Pressed for time? You can also text to donate! No amount is too small; just send a text to 41-444 and type the message CHJ for further instructions.

 

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