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Picture of Rishi Manchanda

On the front lines of caring for the poor, one doctor examines how proposed deep cuts to Medicaid could hurt his patients.

Picture of Ricki Lewis

How far are we from personal genome scans that yield long lists of risks, some meaningful, some not? Who will develop the criteria for what is meaningful, for what a patient should know?

Picture of Maureen OHagan

For a decade, Washington has been fighting for your life. Yet you might not even know this because it's been a quiet battle, a fight designed to work its way into the fabric of your life. It's about your weight — or, more important, the weight of your children.

Picture of Barbara Feder Ostrov

Connecting cell phones to cancer, HIV/AIDS at 30, hospital drug shortages and more in today's Daily Briefing.

Picture of Sunita Sohrabji

The increase in HIV infections has risen alarmingly among Asian American women, and will soon surpass the rate of infections in high-risk populations unless intervening measures are taken, noted a panel of experts in San Francisco on May 17.

Picture of Laura Newman

After three days of listening to expert neurologists, demographers, caregivers, and policy people on Alzheimer's disease, journalist Laura Newman raises tough questions for journalists to consider to avoid oversimplifying this complicated topic.

Picture of Mary Pember

The National Library of Medicine plans an exhibit of Native American healing practices this fall. In preparation, its physician-director met and questioned nine renowned Indian medicine men in Bismark, ND, a rare encounter.

Picture of Barbara Feder Ostrov

Big health policy changes amid California budget woes, ob-gyns refuse overweight patients, and news on Morgellons, plus more from our Daily Briefing.

Picture of Lisa Jones

The construction of a dam near an Indian reservation on the Missouri River forced residents to less fertile land and put an end to their farming habits. Since then, American Indians have experienced a lack of nutrition, leading to diabetes, hypertension and obesity.

Picture of Mary Otto

If you want to know how tough someone’s life has been, look inside his mouth. Teeth are made of the hardest substance in the human body. But poverty, neglect and disease can crack them, break them, ruin them. The patients at the SOME dental clinic on O Street NW have been through a lot. Their teeth tell the story.

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