Skip to main content.

disease

Picture of Barbara Feder Ostrov

Whooping cough is still a major concern for California kids, tainted tomatoes are recalled, and more from our Daily Briefing.

Picture of Hillary Meeks

My two articles (I was originally writing three, but ended up with two lengthy articles) for the Fellowship were definitely acquired through an illuminating process.

Over and over I encountered heads of medical institutions in the area who gave me their polished spin on why there weren't enough physicians in the area and why our huge Medi-Cal population wasn't being served. The two are intertwined as not having enough doctors/resources for the privately insured means that the physicians who DO live here will flock to the patients who pay. Which are not Medi-Cal patients.

Picture of Hillary Meeks

Tulare County, a poor, semi-rural county in California's Central Valley, has a one-third of its population on Medi-Cal — California's version of Medicaid. This is more than any other county in the state, yet the resources to care for the Medi-Cal population are few.

Picture of William Heisel

Dr. David C. Martin may be onto something. In three Antidote posts last week, he made the case that health care workers should not wear surgical scrubs out in public. If seen doing so, they should be confronted. Now, doctors are talking back. 

Picture of Victoria Schlesinger

Decision makers in Sacramento have 4 months to settle their differences about the state's chemical regulations

Picture of William Heisel

On Monday, Dr. David C. Martin, a retired Sacramento anesthesiologist, introduced the idea that the public should be on the watch for health care workers wearing hospital scrubs outside of a medical setting, especially in restaurants. Martin's plea for a public health response continues.

Picture of William Heisel

You probably have been to a restaurant near a hospital and seen a doctor, nurse or medical assistant wearing scrubs and standing in line for a sandwich. You probably didn’t give this a second thought, but Dr. David C. Martin thinks you should be alarmed.

Picture of Mark Taylor

This story is Part 14 of a 15-part series that examines health care needs in Gary, Ind.

When Shantray Hooks, of Gary, lost her job as a restaurant cook in August, she didn’t know how she would pay for doctor visits.

“I had no health insurance and I couldn’t afford to pay a doctor,” said Hooks, 29, who was diagnosed with diabetes several years ago.

A doctor referred her to the Community Health Net of Gary, a federally qualified community health center that provides comprehensive primary care health services and charges on a sliding fee scale for services.

Picture of Angilee Shah

Disease, disaster and video games are highlighted in today's Daily Briefing.

Picture of Manny Hernandez

As you may have learned about through DiabetesMine today, the Diabetes Hands Foundation (the nonprofit responsible for TuDiabetes, EsTuDiabetes and diabetes awareness programs such as Big Blue Test, No-Sugar Added Poetry and Word In Your Hand) has received a capacity building grant from The Leona M. and Harry B. Helmsley Charitable Trust. We wanted to share this great news with the RoH community!

Pages

Announcements

Do the competing bills put forward by House Speaker Nancy Pelosi and Sens. Charles Grassley and Ron Wyden have a chance of becoming law? This webinar will give an overview of the proposals and weigh in on the future of the battle to curb soaring drug prices. Sign-up here!

CONNECT WITH THE COMMUNITY

Follow Us

Facebook


Twitter

CHJ Icon
ReportingHealth