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disparities

Picture of Kellie  Schmitt
“This is just such a powerful but elegantly simple intervention,” said the lead researcher behind a recent study that used parent mentors to enroll families in Medicaid and CHIP coverage.
Picture of Priska Neely
I remember the first time I heard about black infant mortality disparities. I was at a conference last summer on perinatal health and there was one presentation focused on the topic. The chilling statistic was uttered over and over again: black infants in the United States are twice as likely to die
Picture of Francisco Castro
Susana Castro’s arms are deformed, bruised and mangled. At 67-year-old native of Mexico City has suffered from diabetes since she was 40. She now requires three hours of dialysis treatment every third day, or else she will die.
Picture of Alejandra Molina
Black infants in California and across the nation are dying at higher rates than infants of other races. Communities are responding to the disparity in different ways, with some forming groups to train more doulas of color.
Picture of Emily Underwood
Poor people, people in isolated, rural areas and minorities are least likely to receive palliative care and counseling about end-of-life decisions. And one-third of U.S. hospitals don’t have a palliative care team.
Picture of Kellie  Schmitt
Two of the country's leading researchers and a top reporter on gun violence in the U.S. discuss how to cover the epidemic of violence as an urgent and overlooked public health problem.
Picture of Monica McLemore
There is nothing inherent about black skin that increases risks during pregnancy — except over-exposure to the real culprit, racism, which can harm a mother’s body in real, measurable ways.
Picture of Paul Myers
In Tulare County, RV-like mobile units are trying to fill the need among Hispanic farm laborers for mental health care. But so far, the need far outstrips the supply of care.
Picture of Patty  Machelor
"Fixing our foster care crisis” was made possible through major funding from the Community Foundation for Southern Arizona and additional support from the University of Southern California Annenberg Center's Fund for Journalism on Child Well-being. 
Picture of Patty  Machelor
"Fixing our foster care crisis” was made possible through major funding from the Community Foundation for Southern Arizona and additional support from the University of Southern California Annenberg Center's Fund for Journalism on Child Well-being. 

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