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doctor oversight

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"Octomom" Nadya Suleman went to Dr. Michael Kamrava as a troubled patient. She was treated instead by her physician - who lost his license this week - as a customer. And now the media has chosen to treat her as a criminal.

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Every time Public Citizen ranks state medical boards for their effectiveness, some official will say that it is an unfair assessment because state boards all work differently in overseeing doctors. This is partly true — and it is also part of the problem.

 

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Before he was busted for prescribing drugs over the Internet, Dr. Stephen Hollis wrote 43,930 prescriptions for drugs in just one year, about about 170 scrips every workday. How is that even possible? Hollis tells me how.

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After being busted for dispensing prescriptions over the Internet and providing poor medical care to his patients, Dr. Stephen Hollis says he still maintains a thriving eye surgery practice. He talks about his past and present in a surprisingly candid interview.

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A doctor busted for prescribing drugs for an Internet pharmacy talks about how and why he did it.

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Should the California Medical Board make a public case for more money? Yes, William Heisel says, noting that it costs doctors more to protect the few bad doctors in their midst from punishment than it does to help maintain the state’s system of medical rules and guidelines.

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The new filing by the U.S. Drug Enforcement Agency against Dr. Scott Bickman for his role in a California painkiller mill reveals a very sad truth. Maria Garcia’s death could almost certainly have been avoided.

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It’s doubtful that so many health journalists would have covered the case of the late Dr. Mel Levine if he had not appeared on Oprah.

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One year after Dr. Andrew Rutland was accused of killing a woman while trying to perform an abortion, the troubled doctor with a long history of hurting patients has agreed to give up his license.

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Last week Antidote introduced you to Dr. Steven Balt, the rare physician to have the courage to open up about his personal experiences with the physician discipline system. The first part of our interview was posted last week. The last part is below.

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