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Doctors Behaving Badly

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What you can learn from the Minneapolis Star Tribune's great investigation into how Minnesota's medical board failures to sanction doctors even for the most egregious kinds of malpractice.

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Long before Conrad Murray was brought to trial for his role in Michael Jackson's death, Antidote blogger William Heisel reported extensively on the now-convicted doctor and his use of the sedative propofol. Check out his previous work here.

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Illinois state Rep. Mary Flowers talks with me about how Antidote's Doctors Behaving Badly series helped revive her patient safety bill.

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Texas sheriff Robert Roberts and doctor Rolando Arafiles, accused of intimidating whistleblower nurses, get their day in court - while Arafiles has found another hospital job despite the controversy.

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Every time Public Citizen ranks state medical boards for their effectiveness, some official will say that it is an unfair assessment because state boards all work differently in overseeing doctors. This is partly true — and it is also part of the problem.

 

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Before he was busted for prescribing drugs over the Internet, Dr. Stephen Hollis wrote 43,930 prescriptions for drugs in just one year, about about 170 scrips every workday. How is that even possible? Hollis tells me how.

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Should the California Medical Board make a public case for more money? Yes, William Heisel says, noting that it costs doctors more to protect the few bad doctors in their midst from punishment than it does to help maintain the state’s system of medical rules and guidelines.

Picture of William Heisel

Fined by the Nevada medical board and ordered to stop performing abortions, Dr. Algis Martell had a decision to make.

As so many doctors do when they make a mess of their primary specialty, Martell decided to get a makeover.

Picture of William Heisel

Dr. Algis Martell found a unique solution to the abortion debate.

According to the Nevada Board of Medical Examiners, he performed abortions on women who were never pregnant and, when they were pregnant, he said he was performing an abortion but did not.

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It’s doubtful that so many health journalists would have covered the case of the late Dr. Mel Levine if he had not appeared on Oprah.

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