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domestic violence

Picture of Katherine  Kam
Domestic violence poses a dire public health threat, but in many Asian households it’s still viewed as a private family matter.
Picture of Almendra Carpizo
Fifteen years ago, 53-year-old Alicia Corrales walked away from the grips of abuse that had occurred most of her life. Today, she not only continues to heal herself but also aims to aid others whose lives have been scarred and bruised by domestic violence.
Picture of Debra Varnado
Years after the National Black Women’s Health Project identified domestic violence as “the number one public health issue for women of African ancestry,” African-American women continue to be abused at disproportionately higher rates than other women and to be killed more often by a current or forme
Picture of Debra Varnado
A report published by the Los Angeles County Public Health Department shows economic hardship and an inability to support one’s family because monthly earnings do not cover monthly expenses may contribute to the disproportionate rates of domestic violence toward African-American women.
Picture of Debra Varnado
Four years after the city of Los Angeles expanded its domestic abuse response team program to all 21 divisions in the Los Angeles Police Department, a report says the program falls short of its target due to low levels of implementation by patrol officers.
Picture of Gary Walker
This story was produced as part of a larger project led by Gary Walker, a participant in the USC Center for Health Journalism's California Fellowship....
Picture of Almendra Carpizo
More than half of female homicides in the U.S. are linked to intimate partner violence. And one out of 10 victims experienced some form of violence in the month before their death, which suggests there were opportunities for intervention.
Picture of Molly Sullivan
At first the story of Dajha Richards' death was poised to be another daily about a fatal shooting. But as reporter Molly Sullivan combed through her social media accounts, she found a much deeper story of love and abuse.
Picture of Debra Varnado
Public health officials and medical professionals now recognize violence and other major factors — education, employment status, income, experience with discrimination — as key factors for women’s health.
Picture of Almendra Carpizo
In recent years, San Joaquin County has had a higher rate of domestic violence calls for assistance than the rest of the state. A reporter sets out to tell the stories behind the statistics.

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In this webinar, will look at how the COVID-19 pandemic has ushered in a terrifying new reality for domestic violence victims, how organizations and authorities are trying to innovate in response, and how reporters can cover the story in their community. Sign-up here!

The 2020 National Fellowship is going online!Got a great idea for a reporting project on the impact of COVID-19 on vulnerable families or health disparities?  We'll help fund it, and provide you with five days of virtual training in July, plus six months of mentoring. Click here for more information.

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