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domestic violence

Picture of Jeffrey Hess
Community violence and a visit to the doctor might seem unrelated. But for people living in violent communities, and the police who patrol them, it's often more closely related than people think.
Picture of Emily  Cureton

"It’s around 10 p.m. when I call a crisis worker for victims of domestic violence in remote Northern California," writes reporter Emily Cureton. "I’m panicking, 150 miles away in Oregon. I’m really afraid someone is going to get hurt tonight."

Picture of Emily  Cureton

Domestic violence breeds shame and fear, which often keeps the abused from seeking help. Shame and fear also feed family and social dysfunction, and violence can become a normal part of life, a curse that gets passed down from generation to generation.

Picture of Emily  Cureton

Tracking domestic violence is difficult; more so in rural areas. But in California’s Del Norte County, these calls come into law enforcement agencies at a rate two-and-a-half times that of anywhere else in the state.

Picture of Emily  Cureton

Emily Cureton’s reporting was undertaken as a California Health Journalism Fellow at the University of Southern California's Center for Health Journalism. ...

Picture of Nancy  Cambria

It has long been known that growing up in impoverished and dangerous neighborhoods such as Ferguson, Missouri dims life prospects. But now a commanding body of medical research presents a disturbing, biological picture of why.

Picture of Emily  Cureton

Even though people in California's Del Norte County have been reporting domestic violence at a staggering rate, most abuse is suffered in secrecy. That can make it easy to overlook the fact that Native American communities are disproportionately affected.

Picture of Emily  Cureton

For some residents of Del Norte County in Northern California, domestic violence is a daily occurrence. The story of Tara Williams shows just how difficult it can be to find a way out.

Picture of Emily  Cureton

Domestic violence is reported at a higher rate in Del Norte County than anywhere else in California. And experts say the number of convictions, arrests, and 911 calls reflects only a fraction of the actual violence and abuse taking place.

Picture of Martha Rosenberg

Ask law enforcement officers what their most dangerous calls are and they will tell you domestic violence (DV) also called intimate partner violence (IPV) because of the extreme, unpredictable emotions. DV and IPV are often associated with drugs and alcohol and sparked by a perpetrator’s “abandonmen

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