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Ebola

Picture of William Heisel

Thoughtful comparisons can make all the difference for your audience. For example, the threat of Ebola in the U.S. seems scary until you compare it to drunk drivers, who killed 12,000 in the U.S. in 2014. Ebola killed two.

Picture of Anna Almendrala

A year after Thomas Eric Duncan died from Ebola after seeking care at a Texas hospital, what’s different about health preparedness in the U.S.? Reporter Anna Almendrala set out to answer that question, and found a series of heartbreaking stories of loss along the way.

Picture of Anna Almendrala

Today, Sept. 25, marks the one-year anniversary of Thomas Eric Duncan walking into a Dallas emergency room, where two of his nurses contracted the disease before Duncan died. Many nurses still feel unprepared and are seeking stronger safety protections.

Picture of Anna Almendrala

The Ebola outbreak of 2014 has dramatically changed hospitals and clinics across the U.S. Experts across the country say that protocols have changed for the better. But will it be enough when the next pandemic hits?

Picture of Anna Almendrala

It’s been almost five months since the Ebola virus was first diagnosed in the U.S. What have we learned from it?

Picture of William Heisel

If a rubber plantation in one of the world’s poorest countries can successfully stop the spread of Ebola, shouldn't one of best-funded hospitals in one the wealthiest cities in the world be able to as well? Here's what reporters should look for in covering the story.

Picture of William Heisel

When problems arise at a hospital, there are often three responses: Blame the patient, blame the nurse, or blame some forces beyond their control. All three happened in the wake of recent Ebola cases in Dallas, but reporters should be wary of those kinds of claims.

Picture of James  Kityo

Some health experts may wonder whether Ugandans, or to be more precise, the health planners in this part of the world ever take their lessons from their past.

Picture of Nathanael Johnson

Obamacare will intensify the doctor shortage, blood supplies low, babesiosis spreading and more from our Daily Briefing.

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