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Evidence-based medicine

Picture of Judith Garber
A recent CNN story about an insurer denying coverage for proton beam therapy is a classic case of the media hyping an unproven, costly treatment.
Picture of John  James
Two patient advocates make a case for why patients need a stronger bill of rights to ensure they receive quality care and are more involved in care decisions.
Picture of Michael  Hochman

How much time should elapse before a patient returns for a follow-up visit? The answer, of course, is that it depends on the situation. But as a recent JAMA article made clear, there are surprisingly few evidence-based answers to guide doctors here.

Picture of Michael  Hochman

You've no doubt heard of the "Slow Food" movement before, but what about "Slow Medicine"? Two leading practitioners explain the history and reasoning behind their careful, thoughtful philosophy of care. Their smart dispatches will be regularly featured here on the "Slow Medicine" blog.

Picture of Gary Schwitzer

“Between the Lines: Finding the Truth in Medical Literature,” by Marya Zilberberg, MD, MPH, and “The Patient Paradox: Why sexed-up medicine is bad for your health,” by Margaret McCartney, MD, are two books to add your reading list.

Picture of Kate  Benson

Reporting on evidence-based medicine is tricky. Interviewing outside researchers who study the treatment being examined can clarify issues regarding suitability and efficacy and help reporters avoid any spin about the results.

Picture of William Heisel

Should a doctor be able to say sorry to a patient who has been harmed and then avoid the repercussions of the error?

Picture of Trudy  Lieberman

Learn the promises and pitfalls of using hospital safety data in your reporting in this Q&A with Kaiser Health News' Jordan Rau.

Picture of Betsy  Cliff

My experience reporting on health care in Oregon has been mostly positive, particularly with regards to transparency. Public information is typically handed over without fuss, officials are reachable and often willing to talk and the state, at least from my experience, has a generally favorable attitude toward the press. When I started my project on patient safety, I figured I would encounter much the same thing. I was wrong.

Picture of Betsy  Cliff

While many states make information related to medical care complications public, Oregon does not. That means that the best information about an individual hospital’s quality and safety may be kept from the public.

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