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FDA

Picture of Kellie  Schmitt
Dr. Shantanu Nundy explains why the idea of putting swabs in the hands of Americans is gaining traction.
Picture of Fran Smith
Too often, a woman and her doctor have to guess whether a drug is safe, because very few studies have looked at the effects of medications during pregnancy.
Picture of Susan  Abram
Find the people who can tell the story. Scrutinize death records. Isolate the levers that can create change.
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Researchers say a new test for valley fever can return nearly 100 percent accurate results in under two hours. It’s a breakthrough for the orphan disease.
Picture of Ryan White
A program that creates market incentives to encourage drug makers to target rare pediatric diseases seemed like good policy at first. But evidence of the program's effectiveness is missing.
Picture of Jennifer Bihm
Officials for a state campaign aimed at ending tobacco use among California’s children are supporting a tobacco tax increase initiative for the November ballot that will raise the price of cigarettes and vaping products but tobacco companies are fighting to stop it.
Picture of Martha Rosenberg

In May, the FDA warned that fluoroquinolone antibiotics, because of common and sometimes permanent side effects, should only be used as a last resort. The agency followed up in July with language for new label warnings and a Medication Guide to be given to every patient.

Picture of Peter Korn

The Portland Tribune's Peter Korn, a 2009 National Fellow, recently took a look at Oregon residents who've turned to unconventional treatments, and their difficulties in finding doctors who will work them. Korn says this is a story that could be easily localized by reporters elsewhere.

Picture of Martha Rosenberg

A University of Iowa study found MRSA (Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus) in 70 percent of hogs on farms studied and in 64 percent of workers; resistant bacteria were found on an unopened soft drink can in a car following a poultry truck.

Picture of JoNel  Aleccia

The FDA finally took action on a long-delayed petition Thursday, allowing folic acid to be added to corn-masa flour to potentially prevent birth defects. The vitamin has been added to other grains for years.

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