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food access

Picture of Bailey Loosemore
About two years ago today, the Kroger Co. announced its decision to close the only full-service grocery store in downtown Louisville. Overnight, thousands of Louisvillians —many of them struggling with limited resources — were left without a place nearby to purchase basic necessities.
Picture of Bailey Loosemore
Could the University of Louisville develop a research grocery store where students test business practices while residents have a place to shop?
Picture of Bailey Loosemore
Louisville neighborhoods without grocery stores have higher risks of developing illnesses. And it's costing us millions in emergency health care.
Picture of Vikaas Shanker
Obesity is a major problem in Merced County, especially for children. So why is the local school district’s menu full of unhealthy items such as hot dogs and breakfast pizza?
Picture of Bailey Loosemore
Residents of Shelby Park have long bemoaned their lack of options for healthy and affordable food, and those who shopped at the Save-A-Lot will likely have to travel a mile farther.
Picture of Bailey Loosemore
The Courier Journal has received support from the University of Southern California's Center for Health Journalism to embark on a project about food insecurity in Louisville, with the goal of presenting solutions that fit our community.  
Picture of Bailey Loosemore
Over the past decade, study after study has shown that thousands of people who live within certain areas of Louisville don't have adequate access to food.
Picture of Rachel  Dissell
A new project from The Plain Dealer will listen to the voices of Cleveland children sharing what it's like to grow up, play, go to school and live in this city — and what needs to change. But some early reader responses have been troubling.
Picture of Cynthia Poten
The 12-square-mile Hoopa Reservation in Northern California has been grappling with drug abuse for decades. A new reporting project aims to find out how Hoopa youth are navigating the realities of addiction.
Picture of Patty  Machelor
The Arizona Department of Child Safety received more than 9,000 reports regarding child safety from Pima County residents during fiscal year 2016. About 2,100 of those reports resulted in children being removed from homes.

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