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food bank

Picture of Julia Baum
To many of its approximately 2 million residents, Santa Clara County’s nickname “Valley of the Heart’s Delight” might seem like less of a nod to its agricultural roots and more tragically ironic.
Picture of Jessica Cejnar
Klamath residents will be able to score fresh produce next week courtesy of Food for People.
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The Courier Journal's continued coverage of food insecurity in Louisville is supported by the University of Southern California Center for Health Journalism's 2018 National Fellowship....
Picture of Bailey Loosemore
The Courier Journal has received support from the University of Southern California's Center for Health Journalism to embark on a project about food insecurity in Louisville, with the goal of presenting solutions that fit our community.
Picture of Maria Gaura

An estimated 20 percent of all field crops grown on California’s Central Coast are left in the field or thrown out at the packing shed. Volunteers for a farmer-run non-profit in Santa Cruz salvage the surplus and send them to local food banks.

Picture of Maria Gaura

Farmers in Santa Cruz, Monterey and San Benito counties donate thousands of tons of fresh fruits and vegetables to food banks every year, supply feeding centers as far away as Washington and Colorado. It’s a massive foodlift operation that all began 38 years ago with a freezer full of slightly yellow cauliflower.

Picture of Tara  Leonard

As the staff and volunteers at Second Harvest Food Bank work to combine food distribution with community-based nutrition education, the obvious questions arise: Do these peer education programs actually make a difference? Do participants change their eating habits for the better? And do these behavioral changes create measurable differences in participants' health?

Picture of Tara  Leonard

By combining fresh fruit and vegetable delivery with health education, Second Harvest is empowering food bank members to become active participants in their community’s nutrition education. Second Harvest has transformed itself from a “food bank” to a “nutrition bank,” creating the community organizers of tomorrow.

Picture of Maria Gaura

When California’s first food bank opened in this Central Coast city in 1972, its mission was simple and practical: eliminate hunger by collecting society’s surplus food and giving it to people in need. But over the years, the mix of donated foods has changed dramatically. Here's why.

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Bruce Alfano is CEO of the Rural Communities Housing Development Corporation (RCHDC), which develops housing projects involving low-income families and low income elderly. It has expanded into operating a self-help housing program serving Lake, Mendocino, and Humboldt Counties. He was formerly executive director of West County Community Services, an organization offering counseling, youth employment services, a senior center, Sonoma works, adult employment services, a food bank and housing assistance to residents of Guerneville in Sonoma County.

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