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food insecurity

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This story was produced as a project for the 2019 California Fellowship.
Picture of Bailey Loosemore
The Courier Journal's continued coverage of food insecurity in Louisville is supported by the University of Southern California Center for Health Journalism's 2018 National Fellowship.
Picture of Bailey Loosemore
A bag of local organic produce — from fresh corn to tomatoes to broccoli to snap peas — would typically cost more than $30 to buy at any store or farmers markets. But for workers at two Louisville companies, the same bag will cost just $5 this summer.
Picture of Bailey Loosemore
Rural communities nationwide are often hit hardest by food insecurity, meaning the people who live there don't have enough access to healthy, affordable food. Kentucky, according to recently released national data, is no exception.
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As more grocery stores close than open in Jefferson County, some residents say they're still disappointed that the buildings will not again provide food to their communities.
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Highly rural, the communities outside of Crescent City in Northern California are food deserts. “I hear from staff all the time, these kids are hungry when they come to school,” one school administrator says.
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Across Louisville, more than 44,000 people live within food deserts, meaning they can't easily get healthy, affordable food. Here are some key takeaways from The Courier Journal's coverage of the issue.
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The resurgence in the Louisville business community’s interest in socially responsible companies is evident in the popularity of Canopy, a new initiative to foster businesses that do good as an integral part of their overall mission.
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In Louisville's Hazelwood neighborhood, where a third of the residents live in poverty, an urban farm has grown from the site of a former low-income housing complex.
Picture of Bailey Loosemore
About two years ago today, the Kroger Co. announced its decision to close the only full-service grocery store in downtown Louisville. Overnight, thousands of Louisvillians —many of them struggling with limited resources — were left without a place nearby to purchase basic necessities.

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