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Foster care

Picture of Marisa Kwiatkowski
Ashley wanted the abuse to stop. But Butch, her adoptive father, was always around.
Picture of Marisa Kwiatkowski
I met Ashley for the first time in March 2015 at a Noodles & Company in Indianapolis. Her adoptive father Craig Peterson had arranged the meeting. He initially reached out to me about an article I'd written, then shared bits of Ashley's story.
Picture of Marisa Kwiatkowski
Ashley stepped out of Sandy’s red-and-white van. The 10-year-old didn’t say a word, didn’t glance back at Sandy, her adoptive mother. And she refused to meet the hazel eyes of the man waiting in front of her.
Picture of Marisa Kwiatkowski
This is Part 2 of a five-part series was produced as a project for the 2017 National Fellowship. Other stories in this series include:
Picture of Marisa Kwiatkowski
Ashley would be exploited, abused and, ultimately, abandoned by people who said they cared about her. And her invisible wounds would persist for decades.
Picture of Teresa Sforza
Parental drug use is now responsible for one-third of the children in foster care. A reporting team will explore what happens to babies and parents caught in addiction's grip.
Picture of Ed Williams
In states such as New Mexico, many kids are put into treatment foster care who should never be there. The programs, run by private companies, vary widely in quality and safety from state to state.
Picture of Patty  Machelor
Michigan has made successful family reunification a priority. The program is separate from the state’s child welfare and foster care system, and is considered a national leader.
Picture of Patty  Machelor
Fewer Arizona children are being removed from their families and the backlog of uninvestigated child abuse reports is down dramatically. But advocates warn that recent progress to overhaul Arizona’s child welfare system could easily be reversed.

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