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California health officials are noticing a big jump in babies born with congenital syphilis and the Central Valley is at the top of the list. As FM89’s Diana Aguilera reports, state and county health leaders met in Fresno Wednesday to discuss the alarming trend.

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My project will compare the health status of Valley Latinos living in a handful of urban communities to those living in rural towns.

Picture of Ezra David  Romero

How are rivers and health linked in California's Central Valley? Ezra Romero paddles down the San Joaquin River in Fresno to discuss public access to a natural resource in a city that ranks last in the nation for access to parks and has some of the worst health disparities in the state.

Picture of Maria Ortiz-Briones

In a region hobbled by the country's worst air pollution, high obesity rates, and lack of culturally sensitive doctors, Vida en el Valle will take a look at what immediate impacts the Affordable Care Act will have in the San Joaquin Valley.

Picture of Ezra David  Romero

Central California wasn't always the mecca of U.S. agriculture. Historically millions of acres of wetlands shrouded the region, but river diversion for irrigation dried all but five percent of the rivers and streams in the area. We question whether a change in waterways will impact community health.

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Advocates of valley fever research have complained that the disease does not affect enough people to garner attention and funding; local doctors often misdiagnosed it; most data about the disease dates back decades; and the public has little knowledge of the disease and its impact.

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Strong patient advocacy raised the profile of breast cancer and HIV/AIDS. What lessons can those involved in the fight against valley fever learn from other, more high profile diseases?

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The sustained fire power and reach of seven news outlets – combined with community outreach efforts – have yielded results as we approach the one-year anniversary of the new Reporting on Health Collaborative and its series on the toll of valley fever.

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Why is the high school dropout rate in the San Joaquin Valley among the highest in the California? CapRadio will produce a documentary that tells stories of youth and adults touched by the dropout crisis with accuracy, depth, nuance and respect.

Picture of Martha Rosenberg

Faced with two mad cow scares this year, both US and Brazil authorities have debuted the concept of "atypical mad cow disease." Spontaneously-erupting mad cow that has no known cause and may be a genetic mutation has seldom if ever been reported before.

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Medicare Advantage plans are surging in popularity. What’s at stake for seniors in your community as private companies increasingly administer Medicare? This webinar will help cover an essential story on a program that covers 60 million Americans across the country. Sign-up here!

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