Skip to main content.

gangs

Picture of Sonali Kohli
"They come in welled up with emotion, they’re crying and there’s no way they can concentrate on the lesson at hand," says a teacher at Dymally High School in South Los Angeles.
Picture of Adia White
This story is supported by a grant from the USC Annenberg Center for Health Journalism's Impact Fund.
Picture of Tessa Duvall
Cristian Fernandez was propelled to international notoriety when he was just 12, when he fatally beat his 2-year-old brother. But, after seven years of incarceration, how does a 19-year-old begin to move on?
Picture of Denisse Salazar
The effort is bringing together civic leaders, police, educators, community groups and religious leaders. The goals are to curb gang-related crime, help children stay out of gangs, and deal with emotional aftermath of violence.
Picture of Tiffany Lankes
Many of Buffalo’s children spend years battling the consequences of violence and PTSD. School is often the best hope to support them, but the Buffalo district has been slow to act.
Picture of Leoneda Inge
A group of reporters visits L.A.’s Homeboy Industries and learns what second chances mean for young survivors of gang life.
Picture of Ana Ibarra

As Merced County in California's Central Valley grapples with a rising tide of violence over the past few years, local behavioral health clinicians are paying closer attention to PTSD. The county has recorded homicides in record numbers over the past two years.

Picture of Lane Anderson

While Americans tend to think of sex trafficking as a problem that happens overseas, the United States is a major sex trafficking hub for obvious reasons—it's a rich country. An estimated 100,000 children in the U.S. are forced into the sex trade every year.

Picture of Karina Dalmas

Driving around South Central or East Los Angeles, it's common to see young crowds gathering outside mortuaries. Some call the area the "gang capital" of the United States, with more than 450 gangs with at least 45.000 active gang members, according to the LAPD.

Picture of Rebecca Plevin

Some kids born into the gangster lifestyle live to survive. If they want a different future, they will struggle to break free. One charter school aims to rehabilitate such students. This story is part of the Class Dismissed documentary from Capital Public Radio.

Pages

Announcements

Across the country, children are quietly being poisoned by lead, asbestos and other toxins. We'll share innovative reporting and testing strategies from two top reporters that can deliver urgent, high-impact stories. Sign up here for our next Health Matters webinar!

CONNECT WITH THE COMMUNITY

Follow Us

Facebook


Twitter

CHJ Icon
ReportingHealth