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Healing

Picture of Iridian Casarez
Many residents of Northern California’s Humboldt County endure high levels of adversity and loads of toxic stress, leading to poor health behaviors and increased risk of serious health conditions.
Picture of Almendra Carpizo
Fifteen years ago, 53-year-old Alicia Corrales walked away from the grips of abuse that had occurred most of her life. Today, she not only continues to heal herself but also aims to aid others whose lives have been scarred and bruised by domestic violence.
Picture of Debra Varnado
Years after the National Black Women’s Health Project identified domestic violence as “the number one public health issue for women of African ancestry,” African-American women continue to be abused at disproportionately higher rates than other women and to be killed more often by a current or forme
Picture of Rachel  Dissell
This story was produced as part of a larger project led by Rachel Dissell and Brie Zeltner, participants in the 2018 National Fellowship....
Picture of Michael Hill
Correspondent Michael Hill reported this story with the support of the Dennis A. Hunt Fund for Health Journalism, a program of the University of Southern California Center for Health Journalism.
Picture of Alice Miller

Annie Brewster started Health Story Collaborative to give patients a voice, and to bring the human side of illness back into the practice of medical care and recovery. Research suggests that the way we narrate stories of illness can have a profound impact on our mental health.

Picture of Mary Pember

Rose Domnick, a Yup'ik woman in Bethel, Alaska, was incapacitated by fear until she confronted her traumatic past and found healing by exploring her spirituality.

Picture of William Heisel

When dealing with skeptics of vaccine science, understanding their sacred values of prizing purity and independence can help communicate inoculation's benefits.

Picture of Trangdai Glassey-Tranguyen

Trauma and loss, even experienced via narratives, are powerful and can return with new effects in the most unexpected moments. They have direct impact on the lives and mental health of the people who lived them. Employing oral history and community participation, I aim to bring awareness about mental health issues connected to traumatic experiences of Vietnamese Americans.

Picture of Trangdai Glassey-Tranguyen

Trauma and loss, even experienced via narratives, are powerful and can return with new effects in the most unexpected moments. They have direct impact on the lives and mental health of the people who lived them. Employing oral history and community participation, I aim to bring awareness about mental health issues connected to traumatic experiences of Vietnamese Americans.

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