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Health Care

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In 2007, San Francisco embarked on a rare and bold experiment, resolving to provide universal health care to its residents. Four years later, Healthy San Francisco has an enrollment of 54,000 people — between half and three-quarters of the estimated uninsured population. But the city has dug deep

Picture of Barbara Feder Ostrov

The Congressional supercommittee's failure to reach a deal could spell even harder times for health providers and agencies, from hospitals to AIDS treatment programs to doctors who treat Medicare patients. Here's a roundup of the analysis.

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The realm of AIDS/HIV and its prevalence in the African-American community is not one that has gone untouched, yet the problem continues to get worse. A new CEHJF Fellow describes her upcoming reporting project.

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Four years ago, San Francisco launched a grand experiment, becoming the first city in the nation to offer comprehensive health care to its growing ranks of uninsured.

Picture of Michael Stoll

The San Francisco Department of Public Health says it is ahead of the curve in rolling out databases that keep tabs on tens of thousands of patients across a citywide network of clinics and hospitals.

Picture of Michael Stoll

Most participants in Healthy San Francisco, the city’s 2007 initiative to expand care to more than 50,000 uninsured patients, appreciate the overall access to preventative care and treatment for chronic health conditions.

Picture of Michael Stoll

A San Francisco requirement that businesses pay for their employees’ health needs has led to more workers having some form of health care. But after businesses initially stepped up to buy private health insurance for more of their workers, there has been a steady retreat.

Picture of Angilee Shah

Today's Daily Briefing has stories that link health to wealth and vice versa, an interactive on consumers' health spending and a lesson from the end of the long-term health insurance program CLASS.

Picture of Bill Macfadyen

How an online-only local news site learned as much about itself as it did about its topic of drug abuse

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The average immigrant comes to the United States as a healthier individual than the average U.S.-born American. However, by the time they reach the age of 75 or 80, immigrants suffer from much higher rates of chronic illness than their American-born peers.

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If you're a journalist with big ideas who wants your work to matter, the Center for Health Journalism invites you to apply for the all-expenses-paid National Fellowship -- five days of stimulating discussions in Los Angeles about social and health safety net issues, plus reporting and engagement grants of $2,000-$12,000 and six months of expert mentoring.

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