Skip to main content.

health insurance

Picture of Admin User

Dr. Jay Bhattacharya is an assistant professor of medicine and a CHP/PCOR core faculty member. His research focuses on the constraints that vulnerable populations face in making decisions that affect their health, as well as the effects of government policies and programs designed to benefit vulnerable populations. He has published research on the elderly, adolescents, HIV/AIDS and managed care.

Picture of Admin User

Dr. Needleman is a professor at the UCLA School of Public Health. He was previously an assistant professor at the Harvard School of Public Health for eight years and, for 17 year, vice president of Lewin/ICF (now The Lewin Group), a Washington, D.C. health policy research and consulting firm. He has conducted research on nurse staffing and quality of care, the health workforce, the future of public hospitals, nonprofit and for-profit health care, access to care for mental health and chronic illness.

Picture of Admin User

Dr. Halpin's research focuses on health insurance policy, including health insurance benefit design, health care reform, access to care, consumer experiences in managed care, and disease prevention and health promotion. She has been quoted extensively by both print and broadcast media on issues related to national health care reform, particularly for Medicare and Medicaid. She has closely followed the proposals by the 2004 presidential candidates to increase Americans' access to health insurance.

Picture of Admin User

Cindy Ehnes is director of the California Department of Managed Care. She also is an attorney with 25 years of legal experience, much in the area of health insurance and regulatory law. She served previously in the Department as the Deputy Director for Plan and Provider Relations, as a liaison to HMOs, doctors, hospitals and other providers. Her most recent position was as division manager of the self-funded health plans unit serving 300,000 members at the California Public Employees' Retirement System. Cindy brings a substantial patients' rights and health care background.

Picture of Admin User

Carmela Castellano-Garcia is CEO of the California Primary Care Association (CPCA), a professional organization representing more than 600 nonprofit community clinics and health centers in California that provide comprehensive, quality health care services to primarily low-income, uninsured and underserved Californians.

Picture of Admin User

Dr. Bonnie Bade is a medical anthropologist whose work focuses on farm worker health, health care, California agriculture and farm labor, transnational migration, and ethnomedicine and ethnobotany among peoples of both indigenous Oaxaca and indigenous Southern California. Dr. Bade has worked with Mixtec communities in California, the San Diego/Tijuana border region, the San Joaquin Valley, and Oaxaca for over 15 years. Dr. Bade earned her Ph.D. in anthropology at the University of California, Riverside in 1994.

Picture of Megan Chao

As the fastest growing ethnic population in the United States, Latinos have a major impact on the health care system. Nearly one in three Americans will be Latino by 2050, according to an August 2008 estimate by the U.S. Census Bureau. The Latino population is expected to nearly triple from 46.7 million in 2008 to 132.8 million in 2050. As a percentage of the overall U.S. population, Latinos will more than double from 15 to 30 percent.

Picture of Megan Chao

The increasing number of people without insurance -- an estimated 47 million in 2008 -- and growing health care costs are fostering more interest in and movement toward overhaul of the health care system. At the national level and state levels, dozens of proposals are on the table, offered by candidates, businesses, consumer advocates and many others. The proposals range from national health insurance modeled on Medicare to private market options based on tax breaks. Many policy analysts expect substantial movement on the issue in 2009.

Picture of Andrea Kobrinsky Alday

Journalists have to ask hard questions about where sources get their money – and about the science they are promoting. Following the money trail can be daunting. But journalists and whistleblowers are doing just that and uncovering important connections. Here's what to look for.

Picture of Lisa Girion

It started on March 20, 2006, with what I thought was a one-shot story about the health care language gap. Two and a half years later, I am still writing follow-ups (more than 40 articles in all) about the story behind the original story — the long-hidden practice of some insurers of retroactively canceling policyholders with large medical bills.

Pages

Announcements

In this webinar, will look at how the COVID-19 pandemic has ushered in a terrifying new reality for domestic violence victims, how organizations and authorities are trying to innovate in response, and how reporters can cover the story in their community. Sign-up here!

The 2020 National Fellowship is going online!Got a great idea for a reporting project on the impact of COVID-19 on vulnerable families or health disparities?  We'll help fund it, and provide you with five days of virtual training in July, plus six months of mentoring. Click here for more information.

CONNECT WITH THE COMMUNITY

Follow Us

Facebook


Twitter

CHJ Icon
ReportingHealth