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High cancer mortality rates in Portsmouth, Va., might be linked to a variety of factors related to race, socioeconomics, culture and possibly even biology.

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In Portsmouth, Va., where people die of cancer at the highest rate in the state, recent surveys indicate that residents are pretty good about getting screenings for colorectal cancer. They're also among the best in the state for getting mammograms, despite having only two places to go in the city.

Picture of Amy Hansen

In the first part of her three-part series for The Virginian-Pilot, 2012 National Health Journalism Fellow Amy Jeter reports on why people in Portsmouth, VA, are more likely to die of cancer than people elsewhere in the state.

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