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HIV

Picture of Erin Allday
San Franicsco is pushing to be among the first cities in the world to end the transmission of HIV. But reaching those most at risk of dying will require aggressive and unconventional public health strategies.
Picture of Judith Mernit
Harm reduction seeks not to shame people who use drugs into giving them up, but simply to provide them with the tools and support to improve their health.
Picture of Elizabeth Zach
The technology isn’t a panacea for all that ails rural health care today. Some areas still lack the required internet connectivity, and critics say telemedicine doesn't enrich a local economy in the way a hospital does, providing jobs and other community goods.
Picture of Henrik Rehbinder

The court's tie decision last week on Obama's immigration orders will have a profound impact on the Latino community, which has always had the highest numbers of uninsured, writes opinion columnist Henrik Rehbinder.

Picture of Jacob Anderson-Minshall

Comparing HIV-prevention efforts in three California counties reveals the complexities involved in trying to stop the spread of HIV and AIDS once and for all.

Picture of Jacob Anderson-Minshall

Gay black men are at heighten risks for both HIV and depression. Examining why, I discovered numerous studies showing how a variety of psychosocial elements were compounding those risks and negatively influencing health outcomes.

Picture of Rebecca Plevin

New hepatitis C treatments are both staggeringly effective and expensive. This has sparked a nationwide discussion about the high cost of specialty drugs and how such costs are keeping patients from needed treatments. Prescribing data may offer new insights.

Picture of Jacob Anderson-Minshall

San Francisco’s success with early treatment and access to preventive drugs seems to have made a dramatic impact. That raises the question: Can efforts that work among white gay men also work for Fresno’s undocumented immigrants or injection drug users?

Picture of Diana Aguilera

Fresno County has some of the highest rates of STDs in the state. Public health officials say more needs to be done to reach all segments of the community.

Picture of Diana Aguilera

Most people wouldn’t think of the San Joaquin Valley - California’s agricultural heartland - as a hotbed for sexually transmitted infections. But the agriculturally rich yet impoverished region has a significant and growing HIV/AIDS problem that’s troubling local health officials.

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