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homeless

Picture of Claudia Boyd-Barrett

Among Ventura County’s chronically homeless, 37 percent reported a mental illness in the 2015 count. Some officials believe the real percentage is likely higher because the annual survey relies on homeless people self-reporting mental illness, and some may not realize it or don’t want to admit it.

Picture of Claudia Boyd-Barrett

Beaches, sunshine, natural beauty, high-priced homes. In so many ways, Ventura County embodies the affluent, laid-back lifestyle of California’s coastal regions....

Picture of Marc Lester

Every day, outreach workers try to lift homeless alcoholics from the streets of Anchorage, Alaska. In the past, a sober life has always been the goal. But a controversial approach called Housing First is challenging that thinking. Last story in a four-part series.

Picture of Marc Lester

Being homeless isn't easy anywhere, but especially not in Anchorage, Alaska, where hundreds subsist at the confluence of chronic homelessness and addiction. These individuals are the most prolific consumers of public services, gripped by a lifestyle of compounding health problems and risk of death.

Picture of Kyle Hopkins

Jodi Mahle, who lives on the streets of Anchorage, Alaska, woke up one afternoon in November to find her boyfriend dead beside her. Other homeless watched as she pressed on his chest, she said, frantic to jumpstart his pulse outside a Midtown liquor store....

Picture of Marc Lester

Homeless Alaskans are being found dead on the street with alarming regularity. During a one-year period beginning in spring 2009, so many bodies appeared that some residents in the state's largest city that spread rumors of a serial killer. What's being done to assuage their plight?

Picture of Anthony Advincula

Known as Housing for Health program, it is part of the LA County Department of Health Services that collaborates with nonprofit developers, community-based organizations and other government agencies to provide housing opportunities for homeless or nearly homeless population.

Picture of Tammy Worth

How do you make house calls for the homeless? By going straight to the streets. Tammy Worth examines the specialty of street medicine.

Picture of Mary Otto

Reaching poor people with dental care means unraveling so many other things, including the isolation, difficult living conditions, fear and other burdens of poverty.

Picture of R. Jan Gurley

In one year, 477 people in San Francisco, most of them homeless, used $20 million worth of urgent/emergency services — an average of $42,067 each — and taxpayers paid the bill. Knowing who they are is the first step towards treating their illnesses, injuries, and addictions.

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