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homelessness

Picture of Bethany Barnes
This is the first in a three-part series that examines the impact of Portland's housing crisis on children. This series was produced with the support of the University of Southern California Annenberg Center for Health Journalism and its Dennis A. Hunt Fund for Health Journalism....
Picture of Sarah Hunter
New research from RAND finds LA's program to get people off the street and into permanent, supportive housing led to fewer heath visits and a net savings for the county.
Picture of Mark Noack
Youth homelessness is a growing problem in California cities. Numbers from Santa Clara and Alameda counties show that homeless youth have roughly doubled from just two years ago.
Picture of Amy DePaul

Homelessness is a health crisis, and the clock is ticking. With homeless life expectancy between 42 and 52, and half of the nation's homeless at least 50, it's not surprising that Orange and several other California counties have seen a dramatic rise in homeless deaths in recent years.

Picture of Marisa Kwiatkowski
At each turn, the people responsible for her safety failed her — her birth parents, relatives, foster parents, the Indiana Department of Child Services, school officials, therapists and others.
Picture of Debra Krol
In Indian Country, generational poverty, poor schools and a lack of health care all contribute to chronically high rates of stress during childhood.
Picture of Kelly Davis

A pilot program in San Diego worked to get the county's 25 most expensive homeless people into housing with services. The program was a big success — so why hasn’t the program gained more traction?

Picture of Michael  Hochman
New models in Britain and the U.S. take a larger view of the forces that shape people’s health. That’s because sometimes a patient needs an air conditioner more than a hospital bed.
Picture of Joseph  Geha
This story was produced by Joseph Geha as part of his participation in the California Health Journalism Fellowship, a program of the Center for Health Journalism at USC’s Annenberg School of Journalism.
Picture of Ryan White

“One important thing is to find your advocate,” veteran reporter John Gonzales told fellow journalists this week. “You got to find someone who is going to be there for you when you’re having trouble with access.”

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