Skip to main content.

Housing first

Picture of Sarah Hunter
New research from RAND finds LA's program to get people off the street and into permanent, supportive housing led to fewer heath visits and a net savings for the county.
Picture of Kelly Davis

A pilot program in San Diego worked to get the county's 25 most expensive homeless people into housing with services. The program was a big success — so why hasn’t the program gained more traction?

Picture of Ryan White

Star Apartments in L.A.'s Skid Row is a dazzling vision of what homeless housing can look like. But it's not the model the city is banking on to meet its huge need for supportive housing for the region's 45,000 people without homes.

Picture of Claudia Boyd-Barrett

As a journalist, both homelessness and mental illness are uniquely challenging topics to report on. When combined, the reporting challenges double, but so do the potential insights. Claudia Boyd-Barrett shares lessons from her experience reporting on the issue in California's Ventura County.

Picture of Claudia Boyd-Barrett

Older approaches to homelessness required people to achieve sobriety or enter treatment before being moved into permanent housing. Under Housing First, people receive support to stay in their homes and are later paired with services such as health care, substance abuse treatment, and job counseling.

Picture of Marc Lester

Every day, outreach workers try to lift homeless alcoholics from the streets of Anchorage, Alaska. In the past, a sober life has always been the goal. But a controversial approach called Housing First is challenging that thinking. Last story in a four-part series.

Picture of Kyle Hopkins

Jodi Mahle, who lives on the streets of Anchorage, Alaska, woke up one afternoon in November to find her boyfriend dead beside her. Other homeless watched as she pressed on his chest, she said, frantic to jumpstart his pulse outside a Midtown liquor store....

Picture of Marc Lester

Homeless Alaskans are being found dead on the street with alarming regularity. During a one-year period beginning in spring 2009, so many bodies appeared that some residents in the state's largest city that spread rumors of a serial killer. What's being done to assuage their plight?

Picture of Sarah Arnquist

Angelo Solis, a homeless alcoholic, racked up nearly $1 million in medical charges over three years. His case represents the immense health care costs associated with homelessness. Sarah Arnquist offers advice on how to report on this important topic.

Announcements

Do the competing bills put forward by House Speaker Nancy Pelosi and Sens. Charles Grassley and Ron Wyden have a chance of becoming law? This webinar will give an overview of the proposals and weigh in on the future of the battle to curb soaring drug prices. Sign-up here!

CONNECT WITH THE COMMUNITY

Follow Us

Facebook


Twitter

CHJ Icon
ReportingHealth