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Indiana

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Larry Keller doesn’t mince words when it comes to how he feels about the country’s health law. “A typical Cincinnati conservative would rather slit his wrists than consider a so-called Obamacare policy," he said. "But no exaggeration, I wouldn't be here if it weren't for the Healthcare.gov website."

Picture of Lisa   Bernard-Kuhn

Rachel Hill has her diabetes under control after two years of not having insurance. Larry Keller is cancer free after a life-saving surgery, made possible by new insurance coverage. But a glut of new consumers now covered by Medicaid are waiting as much as four months before seeing a doctor.

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You know things are bad in the pork industry when the whistleblowers aren't animal rights activists but the government itself. In May, the US Department of Agriculture's (USDA) Office of the Inspector General exposed extreme sanitation and humane violations in 30 swine slaughterhouses it visited.

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How much did the tobacco industry give to state candidates, committees, and ballot measures during the 2012 election cycle? 

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I figured the air around Chicago rail yards would be dirty...but finding out was not as easy as it seemed.

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A journalist examines the state of health in his home town of Gary, Ind. and finds that his coverage sparks community-wide conversation and change.

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Seeking a ban on methyl iodide in strawberry fields, privatizing Medicare, and questions about CNN's Sanjay Gupta, plus more from our Daily Briefing.

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When the Chicago City Council last week passed an ordinance to reduce emissions from construction equipment working on city jobs, it touched on a larger problem: harmful amounts of diesel exhaust in the city. Journalist Kari Lydersen found troubling emission levels in some neighborhoods.

 

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This story is Part 15 of a 15-part series that examines health care needs in Gary, Ind.

How will health care reform impact Gary and its citizens?

While the Republican-dominated U.S. House of Representatives voted to repeal the Accountable Care Act of 2010, the U.S. Senate isn’t likely to follow suit, meaning the landmark health reform legislation will continue to change the way many Americans receive health care.

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This story is Part 14 of a 15-part series that examines health care needs in Gary, Ind.

When Shantray Hooks, of Gary, lost her job as a restaurant cook in August, she didn’t know how she would pay for doctor visits.

“I had no health insurance and I couldn’t afford to pay a doctor,” said Hooks, 29, who was diagnosed with diabetes several years ago.

A doctor referred her to the Community Health Net of Gary, a federally qualified community health center that provides comprehensive primary care health services and charges on a sliding fee scale for services.

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How can students head back to school in the fall without triggering new waves of sick families, teachers and staff? In this webinar, we’ll take a deeper look at what’s at stake for student learning and wellness as the pandemic continues. Sign-up here!

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