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Infant mortality

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Detroit News' Karen Bouffard embarked on a special project looking at the causes of Detroit’s high child death rate. Andrea Walker examined Baltimore’s infamously violent streets and showed the consequences to the community for the Baltimore Sun.

Picture of Karen Bouffard

It’s impossible to say how much of a health risk illiteracy poses for Detroit children. But those working with Detroit parents say poor reading skills make it harder for parents to raise healthy kids, support families or prepare children with skills needed to enter school ready to learn.

Picture of Karen Bouffard

Women who have a cervix that is shorter than 25 mm, have a 70 percent greater risk of delivering their babies at less than 33 weeks of gestation. But research conducted in Detroit has uncovered a promising treatment for women with short cervixes -- vaginal progesterone.

Picture of Karen Bouffard

Mayor Mike Duggan said he’s well aware of Detroit’s infant mortality problem and to tackle it he will draw upon his experience as president and CEO of the Detroit Medical Center, a position he held from 2004 until he resigned to enter Detroit’s mayoral race.

Picture of Karen Bouffard

Since 1986, Detroit's Infant Mortality program has had more than 1,600 babies born and only five infant deaths with no maternal deaths. The majority of participants are African-American women between 16 and 27 years old, and 98 percent are single mothers living at or below the poverty line.

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More babies are born prematurely in Detroit than in any major city in the United States. Experts blame a confluence of health risks for Detroit’s high infant mortality rate, including inadequate health care, information, support and know-how by young mothers.

Picture of Amy DePaul

My series for Voice of OC on immigrants' health decline as they live in the U.S began with a study that got my attention. It showed that life expectancy rates in the Orange County were higher for Latinos than whites. I was surprised for a couple reasons.

Picture of Karen Bouffard

Living in unsafe or poor neighborhoods can be stressful for children — stress that for some children is compounded by trauma. Early intervention is the key to minimizing the long-term impacts of chronic stress or trauma on children’s health.

Picture of Ryan White

For the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, 2011 was the year of infant mortality. An enterprise reporting project of impressive dimensions, the paper drilled down by zip code looking for the cause of high infant deaths rates and how they could be stemmed.

Picture of Barbara Feder Ostrov

Redefining Alzheimer's disease could dramatically change the way this disease of aging is diagnosed, treated. Plus more from our Daily Briefing.

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