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infectious disease

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Ace medical reporter Lisa Krieger of the San Jose Mercury shares timely reporting tips, with added insights from Stanford's Dr. Seema Yasmin and communications expert Glen Nowak.
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Doctors see patients with cases of food poisoning all the time. But patients too rarely bother to report the incidents to their local health department. If they did, we'd all be happier diners.
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These seven tropical diseases are closer to home than you think. Lurking in Dallas-area backyards is Chagas disease, caused by a parasite that infects more than 300,000 Americans. The disease can cause heart failure and death in humans and dogs and is often missed by doctors.

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If she hadn’t gone to donate blood, Candace Stark wouldn’t have discovered that she harbored a dangerous parasite. Although she hadn’t left Texas in 20 years, swimming in her blood was a tropical parasite that causes a disease called Chagas.

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A year after Thomas Eric Duncan died from Ebola after seeking care at a Texas hospital, what’s different about health preparedness in the U.S.? Reporter Anna Almendrala set out to answer that question, and found a series of heartbreaking stories of loss along the way.

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It’s been almost five months since the Ebola virus was first diagnosed in the U.S. What have we learned from it?

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Addiction usually leaves a wake of chaos, and all kinds of casualties - marriages, jobs, health. Today's opioid addiction crisis is not only claiming lives, but sparking a new epidemic of hepatitis C among new injection drug users.

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New research proves for the first time that the fungus that causes valley fever is living in Washington state, far outside its traditional boundaries in the Southwest U.S. and Mexico. While the findings aren't cause for panic, the news suggests clinicians should be on the watch for symptoms.

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Once addicted to crack cocaine, Sabrina Heard now works with Women's Collective, a D.C.-based organization that seeks to meet the health needs of low-income women, girls and those living with HIV/AIDS by reducing the barriers to care and strengthening networks of support.

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Duane Middleton died shortly after a routine colonoscopy. Then his life insurance provider denied his wife any benefits, a decision later held up in court. So how could three judges conclude that Middleton's death didn't qualify as an "accident"?

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Announcements

Ace reporter Lisa Krieger of the San Jose Mercury will share how she stays on top of the story every day, and offer pro tips that will bolster your own coverage. Sign-up here!

In this webinar discussion, we’ll talk about what questions journalists should ask health systems to gauge their preparedness and understand their potential decisions on rationing care. Sign-up here!

Stuck reporting from home? This webinar will focus on helping reporters find health sources and affected people online, through social platforms and digital communities. Sign-up here!

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