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infectious diseases

Picture of Anna Maria Barry-Jester
The outbreak in California, the largest since the U.S. started tracking hepatitis A, lays bare the fact that homelessness can be as much a cause of disease as the virus itself.
Picture of Elizabeth Zach
The technology isn’t a panacea for all that ails rural health care today. Some areas still lack the required internet connectivity, and critics say telemedicine doesn't enrich a local economy in the way a hospital does, providing jobs and other community goods.
Picture of Seema Yasmin

In the southern U.S., tropical diseases such as Chagas disease, toxocariasis, leishmaniasis can cause debilitating illness, disfigurement and even death. Dr. Seema Yasmin shares how she took on the topic.

Picture of Jacob Anderson-Minshall

Nearly a quarter of HIV+ Americans will be incarcerated at some point each year. For some it will be the first time they learn of their status. For others, it will be the first time they receive treatment for HIV. Unfortunately, when they're released, 90 percent experience interruptions in care.

Picture of Angela Hart

The effect of squalid housing on people’s health is difficult to determine in California's Sonoma County, since there is no study, stockpile of data or government agency that tracks illness in connection with living environments.

Picture of Anna Almendrala

Today, Sept. 25, marks the one-year anniversary of Thomas Eric Duncan walking into a Dallas emergency room, where two of his nurses contracted the disease before Duncan died. Many nurses still feel unprepared and are seeking stronger safety protections.

Picture of Anna Almendrala

The Ebola outbreak of 2014 has dramatically changed hospitals and clinics across the U.S. Experts across the country say that protocols have changed for the better. But will it be enough when the next pandemic hits?

Picture of Kristin Gourlay

Revolutionary new treatments for hepatitis C have hit the market in just the last few months. But they are so expensive that health insurers are balking at the price. What do the drugs' exorbitant costs mean for patients, and who's paying for such treatments?

Picture of Kristin Gourlay

In just a few weeks, another pharmaceutical company will likely win FDA approval for a new drug to cure hepatitis C. It’s big news for those living with the chronic disease, many of whom have been waiting decades for a cure.

Picture of Kristin Gourlay

Hepatitis C infects an estimated 5 million Americans, although most of them don’t know it. But deaths from hepatitis C are on the rise in baby boomers. And throughout New England, new infections are creeping up among a younger generation.

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