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investigative reporting

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To keep your reporting projects on track, think more like a taxi driver and less like a pastry chef.

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Asking the right questions can help you narrow your scope on a big reporting project.

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How to choose and execute an in-depth reporting project – while still doing everything else you have to do.

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The American public for years paid physicians millions of dollars in Medicare bonuses to treat the medically needy. Here's how one reporter told that story.

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Investigative reporter Terri Langford — a self-described Medicare "rookie" — details how she reported her Houston Chronicle series on how private ambulance companies are gaming the Medicare system. 

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Anyone who has written about a topic as emotional as autism knows that patients and their families can be both invaluable and unreliable.

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For the past two years, New York Times reporter Walt Bogdanich has written more about medical radiation than most reporters will in their entire careers. He has examined it from every possible angle, focusing on both the power and the peril of various radiation treatments.

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Employees everywhere sleep a little easier knowing that their company covers the bulk of the cost of their disability insurance. If they are hit by a car or fall of their roof or incur some other injury that prevents them from working, they can count at least a modest income from their insurance policy.

At least that's how the insurance company's brochures make it sound.

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