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Jeff Kelly Lowenstein

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In the second of two parts, reporter Jeff Kelly Lowenstein shares more strategies for ensuring that big reporting projects reach audiences and have impacts. Many think of publication as the end of a project, but it's really the start of an opportunity to make your project matter more.

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To really engage audiences and maximize the impact of a big reporting project, it's vital to plan ahead. Reporter Jeff Kelly Lowenstein shares the strategies he used to give legs to a recent three-part investigative series on nursing home care.

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While the horrific toll from Monday’s Boston Marathon bombings is still being measured, scores of reporters are on the front lines interviewing witnesses and survivors as the nation collectively tries to come to terms with Monday’s tragedy....

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Are those eggs in your breakfast omelette safe to eat? 2011 National Health Journalism Fellow Jeff Kelly Lowenstein looks at the problems that led to the biggest egg recall in history.

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Finding and doing meaningful work can be challenging, but in 2012, let's try to focus on the joys of being a journalist.

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A new reporting project will focus on community health challenges facing predominantly Latino communities in Chicago and the Midwest.

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Investigative journalist-turned-GIS expert Ann Moss Joyner has made some pretty persuasive maps in her time. There was the map showing how an Ohio community’s water plant just couldn’t seem to serve a historically black neighborhood just hundreds of feet away, even as the plant’s water lines snaked miles to other, white neighborhoods.

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This piece looks at the only majority-black nursing home in Illinois that earned the highest possible rating from Nursing Home Compare. The home is also noteworthy because it received that mark while having more than 85 percent of resident care paid for by Medicaid.

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This story distills a national analysis of nursing home data and finds that Illinois is the worst state in the country for black seniors seeking nursing home. Illinois has the highest number of poorly rated majority black facilities in the country and just one black nursing home that received an excellent rating from Nursing Home Compare.

We looked at black and white homes where a high percentage of resident care was paid for by Medicaid and found that the disparities between the two groups actually increased, rather than shrunk as some owners with whom we had spoken predicted.

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The National Health Journalism Fellowships offer journalists from around the country an opportunity to explore the intersection between community health, health policy and the nation's.

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The COVID-19 pandemic has ushered in soaring levels of food insecurity and unmet needs in families across the nation. In our next webinar, we’ll explore fresh angles for deeper reporting on vulnerable families in your community. Sign-up here!

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