Skip to main content.

Jenny McCarthy

Picture of Barbara Feder Ostrov

If it's attention Chicago Sun-Times execs wanted by hiring the celebrity Jenny McCarthy as a columnist and blogger, they certainly got it. Perhaps not the kind they wanted.

Picture of Seth Mnookin

Why on earth is the Chicago Sun-Times "proudly" supporting Jenny McCarthy's anti-vaccine autism conference?

Picture of William Heisel

After Michele Bachmann's ill-advised comments on the cervical cancer vaccine, here are some suggestions for covering vaccines. At the top of the list: stop quoting celebrities.

Picture of William Heisel

One of the main groups involved in Andrew Wakefield’s vaccines-cause-autism scare was called JABS.

The letters stood for Justice Awareness and Basic Support. It billed itself as the “support group for vaccine-damaged children.” A jab, in British parlance, is the same as a shot in the US. And the group was focused on jabs from vaccines as the cause of autism and other disorders.

Picture of William Heisel

Health writers too often take patient stories at face value and don't ask for medical records.

Picture of Amy Wallace
Like writing about abortion or animal rights, writing about vaccines inevitably raises the ire of certain readers. It is not for the timid. Journalist Amy Wallace writes about being sued by an anti-vaccine activist and offers tips for covering this controversial and emotionally-charged topic.
Picture of William Heisel

The June 8 edition of Newsweek has a must-read story about the world's most influential celebrity.

Weston Kosova and Pat Wingert meticulously detail how Oprah Winfrey uses her show, her magazine and her Web site as a platform for some completely loony health advice, including needle-and-thread facelifts, avoiding vaccines, daily hormone injections into the vagina to stop aging and thinking positively as an alternative to surgery.

CONNECT WITH THE COMMUNITY

Follow Us

Facebook


Twitter

CHJ Icon
ReportingHealth