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lead poisoning

Picture of Joe Rubin
An investigative reporter for Capital & Main shares how data, investigative smarts and stubborn persistence eventually culminated in new state legislation.
Picture of Bailey Loosemore
The Courier Journal's continued coverage of food insecurity in Louisville is supported by the University of Southern California Center for Health Journalism's 2018 National Fellowship....
Picture of Joe Rubin
Joe Rubin is a Sacramento-based investigative reporter and a fellow with USC Annenberg’s Center for Health Journalism. His reporting on workplace exposures to lead in California has appeared in Capital & Main.
Picture of Joe Rubin
An investigation into a Sacramento gun range ultimately spurred new legislation to better protect workers from lead poisoning.
Picture of Anna Maria Barry-Jester
A family with a young child in Los Angeles found dangerous levels of lead in their rental. But they haven't been able to find another home in the region's extremely tight housing market.
Picture of Emmanuel Felton
Famously troubled East St. Louis is embracing an idea known as “collective impact.” The idea is to better connect residents to existing services.
Picture of Susan  Abram
They analyzed chipped paint in old homes, hunted down landlords, begged families to speak with them, and even got down on their hands and knees to collect contaminated soil.
Picture of Emmanuel Felton
In East St. Louis, the school district is helping parents get back on their feet.
Picture of Emmanuel Felton
Locals are the first to acknowledge that pouring more money into the city isn’t the only answer.
Picture of Wendy Ruderman
A month after an investigation found dangerous levels of asbestos fibers in some of Philadelphia’s most rundown elementary schools, the school district has begun cleaning up seven of them.

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