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Finding out about a doctor's record from state medical boards isn't as easy as it should be. Consider the story of Kelly Deyo, who died of a prescription overdose last year. Her doctor's record spans four states, but the details aren't easy to unearth.

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This year alone, I have learned of three doctors, two of whom I personally know and one who I went to medical school with, being disciplined by the Medical Board of California. They're all men. Likewise, a recent study found male doctors were more likely to be disciplined. What's going on here?

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The consensus view seems to be that forceps should continue to be part of the medical toolkit. But there are a lot of “ifs” to that statement.

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No one would blame a young couple for curling up on their couch and just forgetting about the rest of the world for a while after their daughter died from a birth injury. But they have quickly tried to make a difference and enact change.

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It’s almost unthinkable. A doctor cutting open patients, fiddling around just enough to make it seem like a surgery is happening, and then sewing them back up without addressing the problem. This isn’t a placebo surgery experiment.

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Patients and their advocates get more tips for working with the media.

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What do patients and their families need to know before telling their stories to the media?

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Three more questions you should pursue based on the debate over the SorryWorks! program, which protects doctors who apologize for medical errors that harm patients.

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Should a doctor be able to say sorry to a patient who has been harmed and then avoid the repercussions of the error?

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Efforts to change laws to encourage doctors to apologize for medical errors while avoiding lawsuits have sparked debate over whether patient safety will be compromised. Here's why.

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