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Medicaid

Picture of Giles Bruce
A look at how the country’s two biggest states have insured their kids helps explain why nearly 4 million American children remain without health coverage.
Picture of Stacey Kallem
It's a shocking finding: A recent study finds only one in 10 moms on Medicaid who screened positive for postpartum depression had even one mental health visit after six months. What's going wrong?
Picture of Binghui Huang
Binghui Huang wrote this series as a project of the National Health Journalism Fellowship, a program of the University of Southern California's Annenberg School of Journalism.
Picture of Luanne Rife
This story was reported with the support of the Dennis A. Hunt Fund for Health Journalism, a program of the University of Southern California Center for Health Journalism.
Picture of Paul Demko
The term-limited Phil Bryant has been holding secret talks after an election that showed strong support for the Obamacare program in red states.
Picture of Trudy  Lieberman
A regional outlet and a national broadcast tell the stories of those kicked off Medicaid in Arkansas due to new work rules with two incisive reports, published the same day.
Picture of Trudy  Lieberman
The election breakthroughs in states such as Nebraska, Utah and Idaho suggest the national conversation on universal coverage is changing.
Picture of Paul Demko
An Idaho native helping to lead the effort to bring more health care to lower-income residents gave a blunt assessment: “It’s a tragedy if we lose,” he said. “If we win, we make history.”
Picture of Judith Solomon
Many people who should remain eligible for Medicaid — because they’re working or qualify for an exemption — will also lose coverage, says CBPP's Judith Solomon.
Picture of Martha Bebinger
The state is way ahead of the pack when it comes to publicly reporting the experiences of Medicaid patients.

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