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Medicaid

Picture of Kellie  Schmitt
The Trump administration’s new public charge rule could discourage immigrants from accessing everything from emergency services to free flu shots, health experts warn.
Picture of Sally Ryan
Over 100,000 undocumented immigrants in Calif.'s San Bernardino County alone are eligible for Medicaid benefits. But does that mean they'll be able to find quality care in the county's safety net?
Picture of Kathleen McGrory
For reporters on the health beat, Medicaid is a vital source of watchdog stories. Check out these six great tips from veteran journalists on how to investigate Medicaid stories at local and regional outlets.
Picture of Giles Bruce
A new study in Health Affairs finds that more than 70% of children on public coverage have a parent employed by a large firm.
Picture of Linda Seltzer
The evolution of the bill from the version introduced into the legislature to the version actually passed and signed demonstrates what can be achieved in practice, but also raises questions about semantics.
Picture of Giles Bruce
“It’s been a very welcoming climate to insuring children,” said Joan Alker, director of Georgetown's Center for Children and Families. “That welcome mat has been pulled back.”
Picture of ChrisAnna Mink
A 5-year-old's long wait for care is emblematic of a much larger problem — too few mental health providers for low-income kids on public coverage.
Picture of Giles Bruce
A look at how the country’s two biggest states have insured their kids helps explain why nearly 4 million American children remain without health coverage.
Picture of Stacey Kallem
It's a shocking finding: A recent study finds only one in 10 moms on Medicaid who screened positive for postpartum depression had even one mental health visit after six months. What's going wrong?
Picture of Binghui Huang
Binghui Huang wrote this series as a project of the National Health Journalism Fellowship, a program of the University of Southern California's Annenberg School of Journalism.

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