Skip to main content.

medical ethics

Picture of Megan Burke

More than 41,000 adults get mental health services from San Diego County. Still, as many as 10,000 in need of help may be falling through the cracks.

Picture of Becca  Aaronson

Political powerhouse Texas Right to Life is working overtime to try to defeat a compromise measure aimed at improving state laws governing “end of life” medical decisions. But with time running out to get Senate Bill 303 passed, the fight over the legislation has shifted from political to personal.

Picture of Kate  Benson

The psychiatric world is close to receiving an updated version of their “Bible.” Officially known as the DSM 5 this tome, published by the Association of Psychiatrists, under goes revision every couple of decades often accompanied by contentious issues and rancor.

Picture of Barbara Feder Ostrov

Marjie Lundstrom's medical ethics scoop was a jaw-dropper: two California doctors had deliberately introduced bacteria into the open head wounds of three brain cancer patients. Here's what you can learn from her coverage of this unfolding scandal.

Picture of William Heisel

Doug Wojcieszak talks about why doctors should apologize — not clam up — over their medical errors, and why some patients criticize his Sorry Works! program.

Picture of Katherine  Leon

How can journalists work better with patients to tell their stories? Here's advice from one experienced patient.

Picture of William Heisel

Aging doctors may not know when they're too old to practice safely. In the name of patient safety, should we be monitoring doctors as they get older?

Picture of Betsy  Cliff

Each year thousands of patients are harmed by medical care in Oregon. A Bend woman, Mary Parker, was one.

Picture of William Heisel

The controversy over revisions to psychiatry's bible, the DSM, isn't just about autism. Guest blogger Mary Schweitzer throws chronic fatigue syndrome into the mix.

Picture of Barbara Feder Ostrov

New medical ethics on health costs, a failed biomed research center, and key 2012 dates for health reform, plus more from our Daily Briefing.

Pages

Announcements

The Center for Health Journalism is dedicated to supporting journalists covering two of the biggest stories of our time — the twin pandemics of COVID-19 and systemic racism and inequities in America. We provide reporters with intensive training instituteswebinars and tips about craft and content and are providing deep and sustained support for reporters and their newsrooms in this historic and difficult moment. You can donate through the USC web portal at this link. Pressed for time? You can also text to donate! No amount is too small; just send a text to 41-444 and type the message CHJ for further instructions.

CONNECT WITH THE COMMUNITY

Follow Us

Facebook


Twitter

CHJ Icon
ReportingHealth