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mental health

Picture of Ross Terrell
Georgia’s APEX program is entering its fifth year. It’s the state’s attempt to increase mental health services in both private and public schools. ...
Picture of Matthew Tinoco
The public is paying mightily for homelessness, regardless of whether or not voters support more funding for homeless services and housing.
Picture of Jessica Seaman
Talking about our personal experiences with mental illness can be difficult, even when it’s just among family and friends. But without these stories, how can we begin to understand an issue that is affecting every community across our state?
Picture of William Heisel
I first became interested in jail suicides when I was reporting on the state prison in Montana, where I found that murders were quite uncommon inside the prison — but suicides were not.
Picture of Adia White
“I have kids telling me still, oh Ms. Henry I lost my stuffed animals that were in the garage and I know that they burned in there and it makes me very sad,” she said. “You know, those little things were people to them.”
Picture of Shirley  Smith

A landmark court decision gives hope to people with mental illness in Mississippi, who are caught up in a dysfunctional mental health system, and their families.

Picture of Giles Bruce
Prevention is always king, but what does the evidence say about the best way to treat kids who have already suffered abuse?
Picture of Martin  Espinoza
When a psychiatric patient shows up at the emergency room at Santa Rosa Memorial Hospital, the staff quickly removes anything dangerous before placing them in a treatment room.
Picture of Jessica Seaman
Mental health and teen suicide have become massive topics in Colorado, especially in recent months as a high school near Denver reported two student deaths in a single semester.

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