Skip to main content.

Mexico

Picture of Barrett Newkirk
For some Californians living near the border, Mexico offers the promise of reliable health care at a cheaper price. Here's how one journalist reported the story, and the lessons he learned along the way.
Picture of Barrett Newkirk
Thousands of people in California's Coachella Valley head to Mexico every year for health care. Often they seek deals on prescription drugs or dental care. For others, Mexico offers easy access to primary care that is cheap and convenient.
Picture of Barrett Newkirk
For a growing number of Californians living near the border, Mexico offers what the United States does not: Reliable health care at an affordable price.
Picture of Barrett Newkirk

What's driving some residents in Palm Springs and the Coachella Valley to seek out health care in Mexico? It turns out it's not just a question of money or cultural familiarity, as Barrett Newkirk reports.

Picture of Lane Anderson

While Americans tend to think of sex trafficking as a problem that happens overseas, the United States is a major sex trafficking hub for obvious reasons—it's a rich country. An estimated 100,000 children in the U.S. are forced into the sex trade every year.

Picture of Julio Vaqueiro Borbolla

There are around 120,000 indigenous Mexican migrants living in California. Most of them are farmworkers, face poor living conditions and higher than normal rates of illnesses. Many don't speak English or Spanish and are living in the country illegaly. They typically don’t have access to health care.

Picture of Brenda Rincon

Juan was 17 when he entered the U.S., backpack on his shoulders, easily passing as an American student through the Tijuana border.
He quickly realized that, as an undocumented immigrant, it wouldn’t be easy to stay in the U.S.. And as a gay man, it wouldn’t be easy to go back to Mexico.

Picture of Martha Rosenberg

Could there be anything worse for the chicken industry than this month's outbreak of an antibiotic-resistant strain of salmonella that hospitalized 42 percent of everyone who got it -- almost 300 in 18 states? Yes.

Picture of Hannah Guzik

Thousands of indigenous people from Mexico exist in extreme poverty in California — the second largest concentration of those workers are nestled in Ventura County. Because many of them are living in the country illegally, they typically don’t have access to health care or farmworker housing.

Picture of Hannah Guzik

The arrival of the Mixtec in the U.S. represents the latest demographic shift among the California’s Latino population. Public health officials and policy-makers often see Latinos as a homogenous group, but they’re far from that.

Pages

Announcements

Get the latest updates from top experts and a leading journalist tracking the story, as well as crucial context and insights for reporting responsibly on this fast-moving public health threat in our next webinar on Feb. 28 at 10 a.m. PT / 1 p.m. ET. Sign-up here!

Got a great idea for a reporting project on vulnerable families or health disparities?  We'll help fund it, and provide you with five days of all-expenses-paid training at USC in July, plus six months of mentoring. Click here for more information.

CONNECT WITH THE COMMUNITY

Follow Us

Facebook


Twitter

CHJ Icon
ReportingHealth