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Michigan

Picture of Patty  Machelor
Michigan has made successful family reunification a priority. The program is separate from the state’s child welfare and foster care system, and is considered a national leader.
Picture of Natasha Dado

Natasha Dado wrote this series for The Arab American News as a fellow in the 2014 National Health Journalism Fellowship, a program of the USC Annenberg School for Communication and Journalism. This story was also published by New American Media. Read earlier parts of this series here:...

Picture of Eric Whitney

GOP leaders say opposition to Obamacare is their No. 1 campaign issue for the midterm election. At the same time, a growing number of Republican states now embrace a major provision of the law — expanding Medicaid, government-funded health benefits for the poor.

Picture of Karen Bouffard

In Michigan, companies have begun to recover, businesses are hiring and the economy is humming again. But recovery has remained elusive for many families whose struggles have been exacerbated by severe cuts to social safety nets, education and social programs.

Picture of Valerie Lego

In 1973, nearly every Michigan resident was exposed to a toxic chemical. As I brought this story out of the shadows and examined the lasting health effects, I had an advantage: the story was heavily archived and documented.

Picture of Kimber Solana

It’s a Medicare reform idea that seems pretty straightforward, and for proponents on both sides of the political aisle, a fair-minded approach to solving the entitlement program’s funding woes -- make more financially well-heeled Medicare beneficiaries foot more of the bill for their care....

Picture of Valerie Lego

This was a story that began a year and a half before I ever wrote the first word. It was first brought to my attention in July 2011 that Michigan had a toxic history. Nearly 40 years ago, due to human error, cattle feed had been mixed with a flame retardant chemical called PBB.

Picture of Leiloni  De Gruy

When HIV/AIDS was thought of as a White, gay disease, it was often the suffering of Black patients that helped the world realize that it could affect anyone. Today, African-Americans remain the racial group most acutely affected by the epidemic.

Picture of Trudy  Lieberman

Republicans and their allies are dusting off an old $500 billion deception about Medicare, trying once more to scare seniors into voting their way. How some media are catching on — and supplying much-needed context.

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