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Milwaukee

Picture of James  Causey
James Causey returned to his old neighborhood in Milwaukee to take a sustained look at how young people are impacted by trauma, and how a community garden is trying to buffer against that damage.
Picture of James  Causey
In Milwaukee, therapists, social workers and criminal justice reform officials are focusing new attention on the well-being of those who suffer traumatic experiences as children. James E. Causey’s reporting on this project was completed with the support of a USC Annenberg Center for Health
Picture of James  Causey
Today, nearly 37 years later, the call seems exceptionally ordinary: Investigate a noise complaint from a resident at an apartment building at North 10th and West Walnut streets. James E. Causey’s reporting on this project was completed with the support of a USC Annenberg Center for H
Picture of James  Causey
Spoken word artists Tina Nixon and Kwabena Antoine Nixon have helped people enveloped in trauma in Milwaukee open up about their innermost fears.
Picture of James  Causey
While he earned $20 for four hours of weed-pulling and trash-picking, Maleak was there for something else: Support. Guidance. A father figure.
Picture of James  Causey
The community garden at the center of Andre Lee Ellis' "We Got This" mentoring program is one of dozens in Milwaukee. Many could use help — from raising money to sweat equity. James E. Causey’s reporting on this project was completed with the support of a USC Annenberg Center for Healt
Picture of James  Causey
Milwaukee Journal Sentinel reporter James E. Causey kept a weekly journal during the summer of 2018, while he was reporting about the "We Got This" summer garden program in one of the city's most troubled neighborhoods. Here he shares some excerpts.
Picture of James  Causey
“I try to provide them with the tools to grow, so they can make that decision not to jump in that (stolen car), and not to pick up that gun, because they need to make those decisions when no one else is around.”
Picture of Crocker Stephenson
This article was produced as a project for the University of Southern California Center for Health Journalism's 2016 National Fellowship.

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