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MRSA

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In a recent Reuters series, a team of reporters exposed what we still don't know about superbugs and highlighted a huge hole in that knowledge: the inaccuracy of death certificates.
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New research offers some much-need recommendations on how to curb MRSA infections among nursing home residents. As it turns out, the activities that pose the greatest risk of infection aren't always what you might think they'd be.

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In an alarming case, two Danish journalists are facing criminal charges from the Danish government for their reporting on MRSA bacteria. When journalists aren’t allowed to report on the sources of infectious diseases, they’re kept from one of their most vital roles.

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A new study finds the average home is a prime reservoir of drug-resistant bacteria MRSA. For reporters, the study opens up a new set of story ideas while providing a fresh opportunity to think about how we write about such infections.

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One would think that hospitals everywhere would be looking at the VA's success and saying, “How do I get in on this?” But even where the results are stunning – in Kentucky – hospitals are not choosing to replicate the initiative.

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MRSA outbreaks among sports teams might be more common than we're led to believe. To get a handle on both health care-associated infections and community-acquired infections, we need to know more about where they originate and what works to fight them.

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It just got even easier to see whether your hospital has a significant infection problem. If state and federal agencies were racing to provide the most useful information in the simplest to understand format, Hospital Compare just took the lead.

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Wish you had a place to compare hospital post-op infection rates before you consider where to have your procedure? In California you can with the state's map of central-line-associated bloodstream infections (CLABSI), MRSA and VRE.

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What would you do if you were picking out vegetables at the grocery story next to a health care worker in scrubs and blood-stained shoe covers?

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Here’s how journalism should work. When the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation (CBC) met with resistance to find out about health-care-associated infections in the country’s hospitals, it persisted.

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