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North Carolina

Picture of Lynn Bonner
North Carolina has one of the worst records in the nation for the deaths of children a year or younger. The rate of black babies’ deaths is a big reason.
Picture of Lynn Bonner
Deaths of African-American babies declined most quickly in states that expanded Medicaid coverage, researchers have found. North Carolina isn’t one of those states.
Picture of Leoneda Inge
This report was produced as a project for the Dennis A. Hunt Fund for Health Journalism, a program of the USC Annenberg Center for Health Journalism.  Other stories in the series include: What happens after a rural North Carolina health clinic closes?
Picture of Leoneda Inge
Warren County, North Carolina has experienced decades of hardship and despair. But Mary Somerville of the Warren Community Health Clinic says nothing was more heartbreaking than the day she had to close the clinic.
Picture of Kellie  Schmitt
Instability and sharp premium increases are roiling health exchanges across the country. As insurers submit their rate requests, here's what our expert panel said reporters should bear in mind.
Picture of Jay Price

While North Carolina has some of the nation’s worst rates of prostate cancer among black men, it also has some of the country’s best intellectual resources to fight the disease.

Picture of Jay Price

Using barbershops as channels for reaching black men with health information is a proven public health technique, one funded by government grants and charities in parts of North Carolina.

Picture of Jay Price

Dr. Adam Zolotor thinks physicians should diagnose prostate cancer based on symptoms rather than screening. Here's why.

Picture of Jay Price

Dr. Adam Zolotor thinks physicians should diagnose prostate cancer based on symptoms rather than screening. "I would pose to you that a usual source of care and a trusted physician or health care provider is the No. 1 thing we can do to get men diagnosed earlier and treated earlier," he said.

Picture of Jay Price

In 2011, a panel of medical experts said that men, regardless of age, should not get the long-used blood test for prostate cancer. The panel’s recommendations caused an instant uproar, with dissent coming in particular from urologists and oncologists.

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