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nutrition

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The first 1,000 days of nutrition can set a child’s course for life or perpetuate a cycle of poverty.
Picture of Sarah Gustavus
In the final installment of their series “Re-connecting with a Healthy Lifestyle,” Antonia Gonzales and Sarah Gustavus examine the role of farming and traditional foods in increasing access to fresh produce in Native American communities.
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Chronic illnesses, particularly diabetes, are a longstanding public health concern in many tribal communities in the Southwest. Sarah Gustavus and Antonia Gonzales examine how some individuals have overcome those challenges and are now sharing information and resources.
Picture of Lauren Weber
It's those first 1,000 days — from conception until a child's second birthday — that the brain most needs the right mix of nutrients to fully form. But programs that focus on such developmental goals are now at risk.
Picture of Ryan White
It's tempting to read this week's news in political terms — Trump guts another Obama policy — but the actual changes are exceedingly modest.
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The number of children diagnosed with developmental disabilities has increased notably in the past two decades, and a growing body of science suggests that environmental pollution, stress and food insecurity are fueling the trend.

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"There were a few times when I felt I had reached a dead end," writes Patricia Wight. "I worried that my stories would be missing the critical first-person experiences needed to bring the issues surrounding obesity to life."

Picture of Patricia Wight

In the fourth part of Patricia Wight's series exploring the link between childhood poverty and obesity, she visits an elementary school in Portland that has developed a creative way to get kids moving. Within minutes of the school doors opening, 16 kids are in the gym, ready for indoor soccer.

Picture of Patricia Wight

Tiffany Krastins stopped receiving food stamp benefits this past September. But with a family of six, money is still tight. “Eight-hundred dollars a month to feed six people, it breaks down to about $1.53 per meal,” she says.

Picture of Lenzy Krehbiel-Burton

“If you’re not able to provide food, it makes it difficult to feel like you’re living a dignified life,” researcher Darcy Freedman said. “It’s a basic need and the mental health implications are very real. ‘If I can’t provide food for my kids or partner, who am I?’”

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